ICD-10 Diagnosis Code I69.011

Memory deficit following ntrm subarachnoid hemorrhage

Diagnosis Code I69.011

ICD-10: I69.011
Short Description: Memory deficit following ntrm subarachnoid hemorrhage
Long Description: Memory deficit following nontraumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage
This is the 2018 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code I69.011

Valid for Submission
The code I69.011 is valid for submission for HIPAA-covered transactions.

Code Classification
  • Diseases of the circulatory system (I00–I99)
    • Cerebrovascular diseases (I60-I69)
      • Sequelae of cerebrovascular disease (I69)

Information for Patients


Hemorrhagic Stroke

Also called: Intracerebral Hemorrhage, Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

A stroke is a medical emergency. There are two types - ischemic and hemorrhagic. Hemorrhagic stroke is the less common type. It happens when a blood vessel breaks and bleeds into the brain. Within minutes, brain cells begin to die. Causes include a bleeding aneurysm, an arteriovenous malformation (AVM), or an artery wall that breaks open.

Symptoms of stroke are

  • Sudden numbness or weakness of the face, arm or leg (especially on one side of the body)
  • Sudden confusion, trouble speaking or understanding speech
  • Sudden trouble seeing in one or both eyes
  • Sudden trouble walking, dizziness, loss of balance or coordination
  • Sudden severe headache with no known cause

It is important to treat strokes as quickly as possible. With a hemorrhagic stroke, the first steps are to find the cause of bleeding in the brain and then control it. Surgery may be needed. Post-stroke rehabilitation can help people overcome disabilities caused by stroke damage.

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

  • Preventing stroke (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Stroke - discharge (Medical Encyclopedia)


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Memory

Every day, you have different experiences and you learn new things. Your brain cannot store all of that information, so it has to decide what is worth remembering. Memory is the process of storing and then remembering this information. There are different types of memory. Short-term memory stores information for a few seconds or minutes. Long-term memory stores it for a longer period of time.

Memory doesn't always work perfectly. As you grow older, it may take longer to remember things.

It's normal to forget things once in awhile. We've all forgotten a name, where we put our keys, or if we locked the front door. If you are a senior who forget things more often than others your age, you may have mild cognitive impairment. Forgetting how to use your phone or find your way home may be signs of a more serious problem, such as

  • Alzheimer's disease
  • Other types of dementia
  • Stroke
  • Depression
  • Head injuries
  • Blood clots or tumors in the brain
  • Kidney, liver, or thyroid problems
  • Reactions to certain medicines

If you're worried about your forgetfulness, see your health care provider.

NIH: National Institute on Aging

  • Memory loss (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Mental status testing (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Remembering tips (Medical Encyclopedia)


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