ICD-10 Diagnosis Code I25.798

Atherosclerosis of CABG w oth angina pectoris

Diagnosis Code I25.798

ICD-10: I25.798
Short Description: Atherosclerosis of CABG w oth angina pectoris
Long Description: Atherosclerosis of other coronary artery bypass graft(s) with other forms of angina pectoris
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code I25.798

Code Classification
  • Diseases of the circulatory system
    • Ischemic heart diseases (I20-I25)
      • Chronic ischemic heart disease (I25)

Information for Medical Professionals

Code Edits
The following edits are applicable to this code:
Adult diagnoses Additional informationCallout TooltipAdult diagnoses
Adult. Age range is 15–124 years inclusive (e.g., senile delirium, mature cataract).

Diagnostic Related Groups
The diagnosis code I25.798 is grouped in the following Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG v33.0)


Convert to ICD-9 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code I25.798 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:

Information for Patients


Angina is chest pain or discomfort you feel when there is not enough blood flow to your heart muscle. Your heart muscle needs the oxygen that the blood carries. Angina may feel like pressure or a squeezing pain in your chest. It may feel like indigestion. You may also feel pain in your shoulders, arms, neck, jaw, or back.

Angina is a symptom of coronary artery disease (CAD), the most common heart disease. CAD happens when a sticky substance called plaque builds up in the arteries that supply blood to the heart, reducing blood flow.

There are three types of angina:

  • Stable angina is the most common type. It happens when the heart is working harder than usual. Stable angina has a regular pattern. Rest and medicines usually help.
  • Unstable angina is the most dangerous. It does not follow a pattern and can happen without physical exertion. It does not go away with rest or medicine. It is a sign that you could have a heart attack soon.
  • Variant angina is rare. It happens when you are resting. Medicines can help.

Not all chest pain or discomfort is angina. If you have chest pain, you should see your health care provider.

NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  • Angina - discharge
  • Angina - when you have chest pain
  • Coronary angiography
  • Electrocardiogram
  • Living with heart disease and angina
  • Stable angina
  • Unstable angina

[Read More]


Also called: Arteriosclerosis

Atherosclerosis is a disease in which plaque builds up inside your arteries. Plaque is a sticky substance made up of fat, cholesterol, calcium, and other substances found in the blood. Over time, plaque hardens and narrows your arteries. That limits the flow of oxygen-rich blood to your body.

Atherosclerosis can lead to serious problems, including

  • Coronary artery disease. These arteries supply blood to your heart. When they are blocked, you can suffer angina or a heart attack.
  • Carotid artery disease. These arteries supply blood to your brain. When they are blocked you can suffer a stroke.
  • Peripheral arterial disease. These arteries are in your arms, legs and pelvis. When they are blocked, you can suffer from numbness, pain and sometimes infections.

Atherosclerosis usually doesn't cause symptoms until it severely narrows or totally blocks an artery. Many people don't know they have it until they have a medical emergency.

A physical exam, imaging, and other diagnostic tests can tell if you have it. Medicines can slow the progress of plaque buildup. Your doctor may also recommend procedures such as angioplasty to open the arteries, or surgery on the coronary or carotid arteries. Lifestyle changes can also help. These include following a healthy diet, getting regular exercise, maintaining a healthy weight, quitting smoking, and managing stress.

NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  • Angioplasty and stent placement - peripheral arteries
  • Arteriogram
  • Atherosclerosis - NIH (National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute)
  • Doppler ultrasound exam of an arm or leg
  • Extremity angiography
  • Hardening of the arteries
  • How Is Atherosclerosis Treated? - NIH (National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute)
  • Magnetic resonance angiography

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Coronary Artery Disease

Also called: CAD, Coronary arteriosclerosis, Coronary atherosclerosis

Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most common type of heart disease. It is the leading cause of death in the United States in both men and women.

CAD happens when the arteries that supply blood to heart muscle become hardened and narrowed. This is due to the buildup of cholesterol and other material, called plaque, on their inner walls. This buildup is called atherosclerosis. As it grows, less blood can flow through the arteries. As a result, the heart muscle can't get the blood or oxygen it needs. This can lead to chest pain (angina) or a heart attack. Most heart attacks happen when a blood clot suddenly cuts off the hearts' blood supply, causing permanent heart damage.

Over time, CAD can also weaken the heart muscle and contribute to heart failure and arrhythmias. Heart failure means the heart can't pump blood well to the rest of the body. Arrhythmias are changes in the normal beating rhythm of the heart.

NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  • Acute coronary syndrome
  • Angioplasty and stent - heart - discharge
  • Angioplasty and stent placement - heart
  • Cardiac catheterization
  • Coronary angiography
  • Coronary artery spasm
  • Coronary heart disease

[Read More]
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