ICD-10 Diagnosis Code H31.23

Gyrate atrophy, choroid

Diagnosis Code H31.23

ICD-10: H31.23
Short Description: Gyrate atrophy, choroid
Long Description: Gyrate atrophy, choroid
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code H31.23

Code Classification
  • Diseases of the eye and adnexa
    • Disorders of choroid and retina (H30-H36)
      • Other disorders of choroid (H31)

Information for Medical Professionals

Diagnostic Related Groups
The diagnosis code H31.23 is grouped in the following Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG v33.0)


Convert to ICD-9 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.
  • 363.57 - Tot gen choroid dyst NEC

  • Chorioretinal atrophy
  • Clinical manifestation of enzyme deficiency
  • Gyrate atrophy

Information for Patients

Eye Diseases

Some eye problems are minor and don't last long. But some can lead to a permanent loss of vision.

Common eye problems include

  • Refractive errors
  • Cataracts - clouded lenses
  • Glaucoma - a disorder caused by damage to the optic nerve
  • Retinal disorders - problems with the nerve layer at the back of the eye
  • Macular degeneration - a disease that destroys sharp, central vision
  • Diabetic eye problems
  • Conjunctivitis - an infection also known as pinkeye

Your best defense is to have regular checkups, because eye diseases do not always have symptoms. Early detection and treatment could prevent vision loss. See an eye care professional right away if you have a sudden change in vision, if everything looks dim, or if you see flashes of light. Other symptoms that need quick attention are pain, double vision, fluid coming from the eye, and inflammation.

NIH: National Eye Institute

  • Anisocoria
  • Chemosis
  • Choroidal dystrophies
  • Coloboma of the iris
  • Episcleritis
  • Eye and orbit ultrasound
  • Eye burning - itching and discharge
  • Eye pain
  • Eye redness
  • Fluorescein angiography
  • Fluorescein eye stain
  • Heterochromia
  • Ophthalmoscopy
  • Optic glioma
  • Optic nerve atrophy
  • Optic neuritis
  • Orbit CT scan
  • Orbital pseudotumor
  • Photophobia
  • Pinguecula
  • Pterygium
  • Pupil - white spots
  • Scleritis
  • Slit-lamp exam
  • Standard ophthalmic exam
  • Subconjunctival hemorrhage
  • Uveitis
  • Watery eyes

[Read More]

Gyrate atrophy of the choroid and retina Gyrate atrophy of the choroid and retina, which is often shortened to gyrate atrophy, is an inherited disorder characterized by progressive vision loss. People with this disorder have an ongoing loss of cells (atrophy) in the retina, which is the specialized light-sensitive tissue that lines the back of the eye, and in a nearby tissue layer called the choroid. During childhood, they begin experiencing nearsightedness (myopia), difficulty seeing in low light (night blindness), and loss of side (peripheral) vision. Over time, their field of vision continues to narrow, resulting in tunnel vision. Many people with gyrate atrophy also develop clouding of the lens of the eyes (cataracts). These progressive vision changes lead to blindness by about the age of 50.Most people with gyrate atrophy have no symptoms other than vision loss, but some have additional features of the disorder. Occasionally, newborns with gyrate atrophy develop excess ammonia in the blood (hyperammonemia), which may lead to poor feeding, vomiting, seizures, or coma. Neonatal hyperammonemia associated with gyrate atrophy generally responds quickly to treatment and does not recur after the newborn period.Gyrate atrophy usually does not affect intelligence; however, abnormalities may be observed in brain imaging or other neurological testing. In some cases, mild to moderate intellectual disability is associated with gyrate atrophy.Gyrate atrophy may also cause disturbances in the nerves connecting the brain and spinal cord to muscles and sensory cells (peripheral nervous system). In some people with the disorder these abnormalities lead to numbness, tingling, or pain in the hands or feet, while in others they are detectable only by electrical testing of the nerve impulses.In some people with gyrate atrophy, a particular type of muscle fibers (type II fibers) break down over time. While this muscle abnormality usually causes no symptoms, it may result in mild weakness.
[Read More]
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