ICD-10 Diagnosis Code H18.52

Epithelial (juvenile) corneal dystrophy

Diagnosis Code H18.52

ICD-10: H18.52
Short Description: Epithelial (juvenile) corneal dystrophy
Long Description: Epithelial (juvenile) corneal dystrophy
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code H18.52

Code Classification
  • Diseases of the eye and adnexa
    • Disorders of sclera, cornea, iris and ciliary body (H15-H22)
      • Other disorders of cornea (H18)

Information for Medical Professionals

Diagnostic Related Groups
The diagnosis code H18.52 is grouped in the following Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG v33.0)


Convert to ICD-9 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.
  • 371.51 - Juv epith cornea dystrph

  • Corneal epithelial and basement membrane dystrophy
  • Dystrophy of anterior cornea
  • Juvenile epithelial corneal dystrophy

Information for Patients

Corneal Disorders

Your cornea is the outermost layer of your eye. It is clear and shaped like a dome. The cornea helps to shield the rest of the eye from germs, dust, and other harmful matter. It also helps your eye to focus. If you wear contact lenses, they float on top of your corneas.

Problems with the cornea include

  • Refractive errors
  • Allergies
  • Infections
  • Injuries
  • Dystrophies - conditions in which parts of the cornea lose clarity due to a buildup of cloudy material

Treatments of corneal disorders include medicines, corneal transplantation, and corneal laser surgery.

NIH: National Eye Institute

  • Cloudy cornea
  • Corneal injury
  • Corneal transplant
  • Corneal ulcers and infections
  • Fuchs dystrophy
  • Keratoconus

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Meesmann corneal dystrophy Meesmann corneal dystrophy is an eye disease that affects the cornea, which is the clear front covering of the eye. This condition is characterized by the formation of tiny round cysts in the outermost layer of the cornea, called the corneal epithelium. This part of the cornea acts as a barrier to help prevent foreign materials, such as dust and bacteria, from entering the eye.In people with Meesmann corneal dystrophy, cysts can appear as early as the first year of life. They usually affect both eyes and increase in number over time. The cysts usually do not cause any symptoms until late adolescence or adulthood, when they start to break open (rupture) on the surface of the cornea and cause irritation. The resulting symptoms typically include increased sensitivity to light (photophobia), twitching of the eyelids (blepharospasm), increased tear production, the sensation of having a foreign object in the eye, and an inability to tolerate wearing contact lenses. Some affected individuals also have temporary episodes of blurred vision.
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