ICD-10 Diagnosis Code G93.3

Postviral fatigue syndrome

Diagnosis Code G93.3

ICD-10: G93.3
Short Description: Postviral fatigue syndrome
Long Description: Postviral fatigue syndrome
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code G93.3

Code Classification
  • Diseases of the nervous system
    • Other disorders of the nervous system (G89-G99)
      • Other disorders of brain (G93)

Information for Medical Professionals

Diagnostic Related Groups
The diagnosis code G93.3 is grouped in the following Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG v33.0)


Convert to ICD-9 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Complaining of postviral syndrome
  • Neurological symptom
  • Postviral excessive daytime sleepiness
  • Postviral fatigue syndrome

Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code G93.3 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:

Information for Patients

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Also called: CFS, ME/CFS, Myalgic Encephalomyelitis, SEID, Systemic Exertion Intolerance Disease

Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a disorder that causes extreme fatigue. This fatigue is not the kind of tired feeling that goes away after you rest. Instead, it lasts a long time and limits your ability to do ordinary daily activities.

The main symptom of CFS is severe fatigue that lasts for 6 months or more. You also have at least four of these other symptoms:

  • Feeling unwell for more than 24 hours after physical activity
  • Muscle pain
  • Memory problems
  • Headaches
  • Pain in multiple joints
  • Sleep problems
  • Sore throat
  • Tender lymph nodes

CFS is hard to diagnose. There are no tests for it, and other illnesses can cause similar symptoms. Your doctor has to rule out other diseases before making a diagnosis of CFS.

No one knows what causes CFS. It is most common in women in their 40s and 50s, but anyone can have it. It can last for years. There is no cure for CFS, so the goal of treatment is to improve symptoms. CFS affects people in different ways. You should work with your doctors to create a treatment program that best meets your own needs. It may include therapies to manage your symptoms, such as medicines to treat pain, sleep disorders, and other problems. It may also include coping techniques, and ways of managing your daily activities.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  • Chronic fatigue syndrome

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