ICD-10 Diagnosis Code G71.0

Muscular dystrophy

Diagnosis Code G71.0

ICD-10: G71.0
Short Description: Muscular dystrophy
Long Description: Muscular dystrophy
This is the 2018 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code G71.0

Valid for Submission
The code G71.0 is valid for submission for HIPAA-covered transactions.

Code Classification
  • Diseases of the nervous system (G00–G99)
    • Diseases of myoneural junction and muscle (G70-G73)
      • Primary disorders of muscles (G71)

Information for Medical Professionals

Convert to ICD-9 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.
  • 359.1 - Hered prog musc dystrphy

Synonyms
  • Adult onset autosomal recessive muscular dystrophy with normal dystrophin
  • Autosomal dominant muscular dystrophy not predominantly limb girdle
  • Autosomal dominant muscular dystrophy with gene located at 5q31
  • Autosomal dominant muscular dystrophy with limb girdle distribution
  • Autosomal recessive muscular dystrophy not predominantly limb girdle
  • Autosomal recessive muscular dystrophy with abnormal dystrophin-associated glycoprotein
  • Autosomal recessive muscular dystrophy with gene located at 15q
  • Autosomal recessive muscular dystrophy with limb girdle distribution
  • Becker muscular dystrophy
  • Benign congenital muscular dystrophy with finger flexion contractures
  • Benign scapuloperoneal muscular dystrophy
  • Benign scapuloperoneal muscular dystrophy with cardiomyopathy
  • Cardiomyopathy in Duchenne muscular dystrophy
  • Caveolin 3 related distal myopathy
  • Combined malformation of central nervous system and skeletal muscle
  • Combined malformation of central nervous system and skeletal muscle
  • Congenital muscular dystrophy
  • Congenital muscular dystrophy with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita
  • Dilated cardiomyopathy secondary to muscular dystrophy
  • Dilated cardiomyopathy secondary to neuromuscular disorder
  • Distal muscular dystrophy
  • Distal muscular dystrophy with adult onset
  • Distal muscular dystrophy with juvenile onset
  • Distal muscular dystrophy, Miyoshi type
  • Distal myopathy 2
  • Duchenne muscular dystrophy
  • Dystrophic cardiomyopathy
  • Early onset myopathy with fatal cardiomyopathy
  • Eichsfeld type congenital muscular dystrophy
  • Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy
  • Erb's muscular dystrophy
  • Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy
  • Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy
  • Hereditary progressive muscular dystrophy
  • Hutterite type of muscular dystrophy
  • Intermediate X-linked muscular dystrophy
  • Ji muscular dystrophy
  • Late onset proximal muscular dystrophy with dysarthria
  • Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy
  • Manifesting female carrier of X-linked muscular dystrophy
  • Menopausal muscular dystrophy syndrome
  • Merosin deficient congenital muscular dystrophy
  • Muscle-eye-brain disease, congenital muscular dystrophy
  • Muscular dystrophy
  • Muscular dystrophy not predominantly limb girdle in distribution
  • Muscular dystrophy with predominantly proximal limb girdle distribution
  • Muscular dystrophy-deafmutism syndrome
  • Ocular muscular dystrophy
  • Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy
  • Pelvic muscular dystrophy
  • Restrictive lung disease
  • Restrictive lung disease due to muscular dystrophy
  • Reunion-Indiana Amish type muscular dystrophy
  • Scapulohumeral muscular dystrophy
  • Scapuloperoneal muscular dystrophy
  • Severe autosomal recessive muscular dystrophy of childhood - North African type
  • Severe childhood autosomal recessive muscular dystrophy
  • Severe scapuloperoneal muscular dystrophy with cardiomyopathy
  • Tibial muscular dystrophy
  • Type 2 lissencephaly
  • Walker-Warburg congenital muscular dystrophy
  • Western type of congenital muscular dystrophy
  • X-linked limb girdle muscular dystrophy with normal dystrophin
  • X-linked muscular dystrophy not predominantly limb girdle
  • X-linked muscular dystrophy with abnormal dystrophin
  • X-linked muscular dystrophy with limb girdle distribution

Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code G71.0 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:


Information for Patients


Muscular Dystrophy

Also called: MD

Muscular dystrophy (MD) is a group of more than 30 inherited diseases. They all cause muscle weakness and muscle loss. Some forms of MD appear in infancy or childhood. Others may not appear until middle age or later. The different types can vary in whom they affect, which muscles they affect, and what the symptoms are. All forms of MD grow worse as the person's muscles get weaker. Most people with MD eventually lose the ability to walk.

There is no cure for muscular dystrophy. Treatments can help with the symptoms and prevent complications. They include physical and speech therapy, orthopedic devices, surgery, and medications. Some people with MD have mild cases that worsen slowly. Others cases are disabling and severe.

NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

  • Becker muscular dystrophy (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Creatine phosphokinase test (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Duchenne muscular dystrophy (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Muscular dystrophy (Medical Encyclopedia)


[Read More]

Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy is a genetic condition characterized by muscle weakness that begins in adulthood, typically after age 40. The first symptom in people with this disorder is usually droopy eyelids (ptosis), followed by difficulty swallowing (dysphagia). The swallowing difficulties begin with food, but as the condition progresses, liquids can be difficult to swallow as well. Many people with this condition have weakness and wasting (atrophy) of the tongue. These problems with food intake may cause malnutrition. Some affected individuals also have weakness in other facial muscles.Individuals with oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy frequently have weakness in the muscles near the center of the body (proximal muscles), particularly muscles in the upper legs and hips. The weakness progresses slowly over time, and people may need the aid of a cane or a walker. Rarely, affected individuals need wheelchair assistance.There are two types of oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy, which are distinguished by their pattern of inheritance. They are known as the autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive types.
[Read More]
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