ICD-10 Diagnosis Code G31.81

Alpers disease

Diagnosis Code G31.81

ICD-10: G31.81
Short Description: Alpers disease
Long Description: Alpers disease
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code G31.81

Code Classification
  • Diseases of the nervous system
    • Other degenerative diseases of the nervous system (G30-G32)
      • Oth degenerative diseases of nervous system, NEC (G31)

Information for Patients

Degenerative Nerve Diseases

Also called: Neurodegenerative diseases

Degenerative nerve diseases affect many of your body's activities, such as balance, movement, talking, breathing, and heart function. Many of these diseases are genetic. Sometimes the cause is a medical condition such as alcoholism, a tumor, or a stroke. Other causes may include toxins, chemicals, and viruses. Sometimes the cause is not known.

Degenerative nerve diseases include

  • Alzheimer's disease
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
  • Friedreich's ataxia
  • Huntington's disease
  • Lewy body disease
  • Parkinson's disease
  • Spinal muscular atrophy

Degenerative nerve diseases can be serious or life-threatening. It depends on the type. Most of them have no cure. Treatments may help improve symptoms, relieve pain, and increase mobility.

  • Multiple system atrophy
  • Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy

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Genetic Brain Disorders

Also called: Inborn genetic brain disorders

A genetic brain disorder is caused by a variation or a mutation in a gene. A variation is a different form of a gene. A mutation is a change in a gene. Genetic brain disorders affect the development and function of the brain.

Some genetic brain disorders are due to random gene mutations or mutations caused by environmental exposure, such as cigarette smoke. Other disorders are inherited, which means that a mutated gene or group of genes is passed down through a family. They can also be due to a combination of both genetic changes and other outside factors.

Some examples of genetic brain disorders include

  • Leukodystrophies
  • Phenylketonuria
  • Tay-Sachs disease
  • Wilson disease

Many people with genetic brain disorders fail to produce enough of certain proteins that influence brain development and function. These brain disorders can cause serious problems that affect the nervous system. Some have treatments to control symptoms. Some are life-threatening.

  • Lesch-Nyhan syndrome
  • Maple syrup urine disease
  • Menkes syndrome
  • Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCLS)
  • Niemann-Pick disease

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Alpers-Huttenlocher syndrome Alpers-Huttenlocher syndrome is one of the most severe of a group of conditions called the POLG-related disorders. The conditions in this group feature a range of similar signs and symptoms involving muscle-, nerve-, and brain-related functions. Alpers-Huttenlocher syndrome typically becomes apparent in children between ages 2 and 4. People with this condition usually have three characteristic features: recurrent seizures that do not improve with treatment (intractable epilepsy), loss of mental and movement abilities (psychomotor regression), and liver disease.People with Alpers-Huttenlocher syndrome usually have additional signs and symptoms. Most have problems with coordination and balance (ataxia) and disturbances in nerve function (neuropathy). Neuropathy can lead to abnormal or absent reflexes (areflexia). In addition, affected individuals may develop weak muscle tone (hypotonia) that worsens until they lose the ability to control their muscles and movement. Some people with Alpers-Huttenlocher syndrome lose the ability to walk, sit, or feed themselves. Other movement-related symptoms in affected individuals can include involuntary muscle twitches (myoclonus), uncontrollable movements of the limbs (choreoathetosis), or a pattern of movement abnormalities known as parkinsonism.Affected individuals may have other brain-related signs and symptoms. Migraine headaches, often with visual sensations or auras, are common. Additionally, people with this condition may have decreased brain function that is demonstrated as sleepiness, inability to concentrate, irritability, or loss of language skills or memory. Some people with the condition may lose their eyesight or hearing. People with Alpers-Huttenlocher syndrome can survive from a few months to more than 10 years after the condition first appears.
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