ICD-10 Diagnosis Code G25.82

Stiff-man syndrome

Diagnosis Code G25.82

ICD-10: G25.82
Short Description: Stiff-man syndrome
Long Description: Stiff-man syndrome
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code G25.82

Code Classification
  • Diseases of the nervous system
    • Extrapyramidal and movement disorders (G20-G26)
      • Other extrapyramidal and movement disorders (G25)

Information for Patients

Autoimmune Diseases

Your body's immune system protects you from disease and infection. But if you have an autoimmune disease, your immune system attacks healthy cells in your body by mistake. Autoimmune diseases can affect many parts of the body.

No one is sure what causes autoimmune diseases. They do tend to run in families. Women - particularly African-American, Hispanic-American, and Native-American women - have a higher risk for some autoimmune diseases.

There are more than 80 types of autoimmune diseases, and some have similar symptoms. This makes it hard for your health care provider to know if you really have one of these diseases, and if so, which one. Getting a diagnosis can be frustrating and stressful. Often, the first symptoms are fatigue, muscle aches and a low fever. The classic sign of an autoimmune disease is inflammation, which can cause redness, heat, pain and swelling.

The diseases may also have flare-ups, when they get worse, and remissions, when symptoms get better or disappear. Treatment depends on the disease, but in most cases one important goal is to reduce inflammation. Sometimes doctors prescribe corticosteroids or other drugs that reduce your immune response.

  • Autoimmune disorders
  • Complement

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Neuromuscular Disorders

Neuromuscular disorders affect the nerves that control your voluntary muscles. Voluntary muscles are the ones you can control, like in your arms and legs. Your nerve cells, also called neurons, send the messages that control these muscles. When the neurons become unhealthy or die, communication between your nervous system and muscles breaks down. As a result, your muscles weaken and waste away. The weakness can lead to twitching, cramps, aches and pains, and joint and movement problems. Sometimes it also affects heart function and your ability to breathe.

Examples of neuromuscular disorders include

  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Myasthenia gravis
  • Spinal muscular atrophy

Many neuromuscular diseases are genetic, which means they run in families or there is a mutation in your genes. Sometimes, an immune system disorder can cause them. Most of them have no cure. The goal of treatment is to improve symptoms, increase mobility and lengthen life.

  • Apraxia
  • Hand or foot spasms
  • Muscle atrophy
  • Muscle function loss
  • Muscle twitching
  • Myotonia congenita
  • Spasticity

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Spinal Cord Diseases

Your spinal cord is a bundle of nerves that runs down the middle of your back. It carries signals back and forth between your body and your brain. It is protected by your vertebrae, which are the bone disks that make up your spine. If you have an accident that damages the vertebrae or other parts of the spine, this can also injure the spinal cord. Other spinal cord problems include

  • Tumors
  • Infections such as meningitis and polio
  • Inflammatory diseases
  • Autoimmune diseases
  • Degenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and spinal muscular atrophy

Symptoms vary but might include pain, numbness, loss of sensation and muscle weakness. These symptoms can occur around the spinal cord, and also in other areas such as your arms and legs. Treatments often include medicines and surgery.

  • Epidural abscess
  • Spinal cord abscess
  • Spinal tumor
  • Subacute combined degeneration
  • Syphilitic myelopathy

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Hereditary hyperekplexia Hereditary hyperekplexia is a condition in which affected infants have increased muscle tone (hypertonia) and an exaggerated startle reaction to unexpected stimuli, especially loud noises. Following the startle reaction, infants experience a brief period in which they are very rigid and unable to move. During these rigid periods, some infants stop breathing, which, if prolonged, can be fatal. This condition may explain some cases of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), which is a major cause of unexplained death in babies younger than 1 year. Infants with hereditary hyperekplexia have hypertonia at all times, except when they are sleeping.Other signs and symptoms of hereditary hyperekplexia can include muscle twitches when falling asleep (hypnagogic myoclonus) and movements of the arms or legs while asleep. Some infants, when tapped on the nose, extend their head forward and have spasms of the limb and neck muscles. Rarely, infants with hereditary hyperekplexia experience recurrent seizures (epilepsy).The signs and symptoms of hereditary hyperekplexia typically fade by age 1. However, older individuals with hereditary hyperekplexia may still startle easily and have periods of rigidity, which can cause them to fall down. Some individuals with this condition have a low tolerance for crowded places and loud noises. Some affected people have persistent limb movements during sleep. Affected individuals who have epilepsy have the disorder throughout their lives.
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