ICD-10 Diagnosis Code F98.0

Enuresis not due to a substance or known physiol condition

Diagnosis Code F98.0

ICD-10: F98.0
Short Description: Enuresis not due to a substance or known physiol condition
Long Description: Enuresis not due to a substance or known physiological condition
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code F98.0

Code Classification
  • Mental and behavioural disorders
    • Behavioral and emotional disorders with onset usually occurring in childhood and adolescence (F90-F98)
      • Oth behav/emotn disord w onset usly occur in chldhd and adol (F98)

Information for Medical Professionals

Convert to ICD-9 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Dependency urinary incontinence
  • Nocturnal enuresis
  • Nocturnal enuresis
  • Nocturnal enuresis
  • Non-organic nocturnal enuresis
  • Non-organic primary nocturnal enuresis
  • Non-organic secondary nocturnal enuresis
  • Primary nocturnal enuresis
  • Secondary nocturnal enuresis
  • Urinary incontinence of non-organic origin

Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code F98.0 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:

Information for Patients


Also called: Enuresis

Many children wet the bed until they are 5 or even older. A child's bladder might be too small. Or the amount of urine produced overnight can be more than the bladder can hold. Some children sleep too deeply or take longer to learn bladder control. Stress can also be a factor. Children should not be punished for wetting the bed. They don't do it on purpose, and most outgrow it.

Call the doctor if your child is 7 years old or older and wets the bed more than two or three times in a week. The doctor will look for and treat any other heath problems that could cause the bedwetting. Bedwetting alarms, bladder training, and medicines might help with the bedwetting.

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  • Bedwetting

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