ICD-10 Diagnosis Code E83.10

Disorder of iron metabolism, unspecified

Diagnosis Code E83.10

ICD-10: E83.10
Short Description: Disorder of iron metabolism, unspecified
Long Description: Disorder of iron metabolism, unspecified
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code E83.10

Code Classification
  • Endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases
    • Metabolic disorders (E70-E88)
      • Disorders of mineral metabolism (E83)

Information for Patients


Iron is a mineral that our bodies need for many functions. For example, iron is part of hemoglobin, a protein which carries oxygen from our lungs throughout our bodies. It helps our muscles store and use oxygen. Iron is also part of many other proteins and enzymes.

Your body needs the right amount of iron. If you have too little iron, you may develop iron deficiency anemia. Causes of low iron levels include blood loss, poor diet, or an inability to absorb enough iron from foods. People at higher risk of having too little iron are young children and women who are pregnant or have periods.

Too much iron can damage your body. Taking too many iron supplements can cause iron poisoning. Some people have an inherited disease called hemochromatosis. It causes too much iron to build up in the body.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  • Anemia caused by low iron -- infants and toddlers
  • Ferritin blood test
  • Iron deficiency anemia
  • Iron in diet
  • Serum iron test
  • Taking iron supplements
  • Total iron binding capacity

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Metabolic Disorders

Metabolism is the process your body uses to get or make energy from the food you eat. Food is made up of proteins, carbohydrates, and fats. Chemicals in your digestive system break the food parts down into sugars and acids, your body's fuel. Your body can use this fuel right away, or it can store the energy in your body tissues, such as your liver, muscles, and body fat.

A metabolic disorder occurs when abnormal chemical reactions in your body disrupt this process. When this happens, you might have too much of some substances or too little of other ones that you need to stay healthy. There are different groups of disorders. Some affect the breakdown of amino acids, carbohydrates, or lipids. Another group, mitochondrial diseases, affects the parts of the cells that produce the energy.

You can develop a metabolic disorder when some organs, such as your liver or pancreas, become diseased or do not function normally. Diabetes is an example.

  • Acidosis
  • Alkalosis
  • Lactic acid test
  • Metabolic acidosis
  • Metabolic neuropathies
  • Pseudohypoparathyroidism

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