ICD-10 Diagnosis Code E72.29

Other disorders of urea cycle metabolism

Diagnosis Code E72.29

ICD-10: E72.29
Short Description: Other disorders of urea cycle metabolism
Long Description: Other disorders of urea cycle metabolism
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code E72.29


Code Classification
  • Endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases (E00–E90)
    • Metabolic disorders (E70-E88)
      • Other disorders of amino-acid metabolism (E72)

Information for Patients


Metabolic Disorders

Metabolism is the process your body uses to get or make energy from the food you eat. Food is made up of proteins, carbohydrates, and fats. Chemicals in your digestive system break the food parts down into sugars and acids, your body's fuel. Your body can use this fuel right away, or it can store the energy in your body tissues, such as your liver, muscles, and body fat.

A metabolic disorder occurs when abnormal chemical reactions in your body disrupt this process. When this happens, you might have too much of some substances or too little of other ones that you need to stay healthy. There are different groups of disorders. Some affect the breakdown of amino acids, carbohydrates, or lipids. Another group, mitochondrial diseases, affects the parts of the cells that produce the energy.

You can develop a metabolic disorder when some organs, such as your liver or pancreas, become diseased or do not function normally. Diabetes is an example.

  • Acidosis
  • Alkalosis
  • Lactic acid test
  • Metabolic acidosis
  • Metabolic neuropathies
  • Pseudohypoparathyroidism


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Carbamoyl phosphate synthetase I deficiency Carbamoyl phosphate synthetase I deficiency is an inherited disorder that causes ammonia to accumulate in the blood (hyperammonemia). Ammonia, which is formed when proteins are broken down in the body, is toxic if the levels become too high. The brain is especially sensitive to the effects of excess ammonia.In the first few days of life, infants with carbamoyl phosphate synthetase I deficiency typically exhibit the effects of hyperammonemia, which may include unusual sleepiness, poorly regulated breathing rate or body temperature, unwillingness to feed, vomiting after feeding, unusual body movements, seizures, or coma. Affected individuals who survive the newborn period may experience recurrence of these symptoms if diet is not carefully managed or if they experience infections or other stressors. They may also have delayed development and intellectual disability.In some people with carbamoyl phosphate synthetase I deficiency, signs and symptoms may be less severe and appear later in life.
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Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency is an inherited disorder that causes ammonia to accumulate in the blood. Ammonia, which is formed when proteins are broken down in the body, is toxic if the levels become too high. The nervous system is especially sensitive to the effects of excess ammonia.Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency often becomes evident in the first few days of life. An infant with ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency may be lacking in energy (lethargic) or unwilling to eat, and have poorly-controlled breathing rate or body temperature. Some babies with this disorder may experience seizures or unusual body movements, or go into a coma. Complications from ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency may include developmental delay and intellectual disability. Progressive liver damage, skin lesions, and brittle hair may also be seen.In some affected individuals, signs and symptoms of ornithine transcarbamylase may be less severe, and may not appear until later in life.
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N-acetylglutamate synthase deficiency N-acetylglutamate synthase deficiency is an inherited disorder that causes ammonia to accumulate in the blood. Ammonia, which is formed when proteins are broken down in the body, is toxic if the levels become too high. The nervous system is especially sensitive to the effects of excess ammonia.N-acetylglutamate synthase deficiency may become evident in the first few days of life. An infant with this condition may be lacking in energy (lethargic) or unwilling to eat, and have a poorly controlled breathing rate or body temperature. Some babies with this disorder may experience seizures or unusual body movements, or go into a coma. Complications of N-acetylglutamate synthase deficiency may include developmental delay and intellectual disability.In some affected individuals, signs and symptoms of N-acetylglutamate synthase deficiency are less severe, and do not appear until later in life. Some people with this form of the disorder cannot tolerate high-protein foods such as meat. They may experience sudden episodes of ammonia toxicity, resulting in vomiting, lack of coordination, confusion or coma, in response to illness or other stress.
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