ICD-10 Diagnosis Code E26.81

Bartter's syndrome

Diagnosis Code E26.81

ICD-10: E26.81
Short Description: Bartter's syndrome
Long Description: Bartter's syndrome
This is the 2018 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code E26.81

Valid for Submission
The code E26.81 is valid for submission for HIPAA-covered transactions.

Code Classification
  • Endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases (E00–E90)
    • Disorders of other endocrine glands (E20-E35)
      • Hyperaldosteronism (E26)

Information for Medical Professionals

Diagnostic Related Groups
The diagnosis code E26.81 is grouped in the following Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG V34.0)

  • 643 - ENDOCRINE DISORDERS WITH MCC
  • 644 - ENDOCRINE DISORDERS WITH CC
  • 645 - ENDOCRINE DISORDERS WITHOUT CC/MCC

Convert to ICD-9 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

Synonyms
  • Bartter syndrome
  • Bartter syndrome antenatal type 1
  • Bartter syndrome antenatal type 2
  • Bartter syndrome type 3
  • Bartter syndrome type 4
  • Bartter's syndrome with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis
  • Hypercalciuria
  • Hypochloremic alkalosis
  • Hypokalemic nephropathy
  • Nephrocalcinosis
  • Symptomatic disorders of the urinary tract

Information for Patients


Adrenal Gland Disorders

The adrenal glands are small glands located on top of each kidney. They produce hormones that you can't live without, including sex hormones and cortisol. Cortisol helps you respond to stress and has many other important functions.

With adrenal gland disorders, your glands make too much or not enough hormones. In Cushing's syndrome, there's too much cortisol, while with Addison's disease, there is too little. Some people are born unable to make enough cortisol.

Causes of adrenal gland disorders include

  • Genetic mutations
  • Tumors including pheochromocytomas
  • Infections
  • A problem in another gland, such as the pituitary, which helps to regulate the adrenal gland
  • Certain medicines

Treatment depends on which problem you have. Surgery or medicines can treat many adrenal gland disorders.

NIH: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

  • 17-hydroxycorticosteroids (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • 17-OH progesterone (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • 24-hour urinary aldosterone excretion rate (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • ACTH (cosyntropin) stimulation test (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • ACTH blood test (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Acute adrenal crisis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Adrenal glands (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Adrenalectomy (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Aldosterone blood test (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Hyperaldosteronism - primary and secondary (Medical Encyclopedia)


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Kidney Diseases

Also called: Renal disease

You have two kidneys, each about the size of your fist. They are near the middle of your back, just below the rib cage. Inside each kidney there are about a million tiny structures called nephrons. They filter your blood. They remove wastes and extra water, which become urine. The urine flows through tubes called ureters. It goes to your bladder, which stores the urine until you go to the bathroom.

Most kidney diseases attack the nephrons. This damage may leave kidneys unable to remove wastes. Causes can include genetic problems, injuries, or medicines. You have a higher risk of kidney disease if you have diabetes, high blood pressure, or a close family member with kidney disease. Chronic kidney disease damages the nephrons slowly over several years. Other kidney problems include

  • Cancer
  • Cysts
  • Stones
  • Infections

Your doctor can do blood and urine tests to check if you have kidney disease. If your kidneys fail, you will need dialysis or a kidney transplant.

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  • ACE inhibitors (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Acute nephritic syndrome (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Analgesic nephropathy (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Atheroembolic renal disease (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Bartter syndrome (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Bilateral hydronephrosis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Congenital nephrotic syndrome (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Distal renal tubular acidosis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Glomerulonephritis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Goodpasture syndrome (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • IgA nephropathy (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Injury - kidney and ureter (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Interstitial nephritis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Kidney removal (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Kidney removal - discharge (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Medicines and Kidney Disease - NIH (National Kidney Disease Education Program)
  • Membranoproliferative GN I (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Membranous nephropathy (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Minimal change disease (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Nephrocalcinosis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Nephrotic syndrome (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Obstructive uropathy (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Perirenal abscess (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Proximal renal tubular acidosis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Reflux nephropathy (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Renal papillary necrosis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Renal perfusion scintiscan (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Renal vein thrombosis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Unilateral hydronephrosis (Medical Encyclopedia)


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Bartter syndrome Bartter syndrome is a group of very similar kidney disorders that cause an imbalance of potassium, sodium, chloride, and related molecules in the body.In some cases, Bartter syndrome becomes apparent before birth. The disorder can cause polyhydramnios, which is an increased volume of fluid surrounding the fetus (amniotic fluid). Polyhydramnios increases the risk of premature birth.Beginning in infancy, affected individuals often fail to grow and gain weight at the expected rate (failure to thrive). They lose excess amounts of salt (sodium chloride) in their urine, which leads to dehydration, constipation, and increased urine production (polyuria). In addition, large amounts of calcium are lost through the urine (hypercalciuria), which can cause weakening of the bones (osteopenia). Some of the calcium is deposited in the kidneys as they are concentrating urine, leading to hardening of the kidney tissue (nephrocalcinosis). Bartter syndrome is also characterized by low levels of potassium in the blood (hypokalemia), which can result in muscle weakness, cramping, and fatigue. Rarely, affected children develop hearing loss caused by abnormalities in the inner ear (sensorineural deafness).Two major forms of Bartter syndrome are distinguished by their age of onset and severity. One form begins before birth (antenatal) and is often life-threatening. The other form, often called the classical form, begins in early childhood and tends to be less severe. Once the genetic causes of Bartter syndrome were identified, researchers also split the disorder into different types based on the genes involved. Types I, II, and IV have the features of antenatal Bartter syndrome. Because type IV is also associated with hearing loss, it is sometimes called antenatal Bartter syndrome with sensorineural deafness. Type III usually has the features of classical Bartter syndrome.
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