ICD-10 Diagnosis Code D89.82

Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome [ALPS]

Diagnosis Code D89.82

ICD-10: D89.82
Short Description: Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome [ALPS]
Long Description: Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome [ALPS]
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code D89.82

Code Classification
  • Diseases of the blood and blood-forming organs and certain disorders involving the immune mechanism
    • Certain disorders involving the immune mechanism (D80-D89)
      • Oth disorders involving the immune mechanism, NEC (D89)

Information for Medical Professionals

Diagnostic Related Groups
The diagnosis code D89.82 is grouped in the following Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG v33.0)


Convert to ICD-9 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.
  • 279.41 - Autoimmun lymphprof synd

  • Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome

Information for Patients

Autoimmune Diseases

Your body's immune system protects you from disease and infection. But if you have an autoimmune disease, your immune system attacks healthy cells in your body by mistake. Autoimmune diseases can affect many parts of the body.

No one is sure what causes autoimmune diseases. They do tend to run in families. Women - particularly African-American, Hispanic-American, and Native-American women - have a higher risk for some autoimmune diseases.

There are more than 80 types of autoimmune diseases, and some have similar symptoms. This makes it hard for your health care provider to know if you really have one of these diseases, and if so, which one. Getting a diagnosis can be frustrating and stressful. Often, the first symptoms are fatigue, muscle aches and a low fever. The classic sign of an autoimmune disease is inflammation, which can cause redness, heat, pain and swelling.

The diseases may also have flare-ups, when they get worse, and remissions, when symptoms get better or disappear. Treatment depends on the disease, but in most cases one important goal is to reduce inflammation. Sometimes doctors prescribe corticosteroids or other drugs that reduce your immune response.

  • Autoimmune disorders
  • Complement

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Lymphatic Diseases

The lymphatic system is a network of tissues and organs. It is made up of

  • Lymph - a fluid that contains white blood cells that defend against germs
  • Lymph vessels - vessels that carry lymph throughout your body. They are different from blood vessels.
  • Lymph nodes - glands found throughout the lymph vessels. Along with your spleen, these nodes are where white blood cells fight infection.

Your bone marrow and thymus produce the cells in lymph. They are part of the system, too.

The lymphatic system clears away infection and keeps your body fluids in balance. If it's not working properly, fluid builds in your tissues and causes swelling, called lymphedema. Other lymphatic system problems can include infections, blockage, and cancer.

  • Cancer and lymph nodes
  • Cystic hygroma
  • Groin lump
  • Lymph node biopsy
  • Lymph system
  • Lymphadenitis
  • Lymphangitis
  • Lymphofollicular hyperplasia
  • Neck lump
  • Swollen lymph nodes

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Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is an inherited disorder in which the body cannot properly regulate the number of immune system cells (lymphocytes). ALPS is characterized by the production of an abnormally large number of lymphocytes (lymphoproliferation). Accumulation of excess lymphocytes results in enlargement of the lymph nodes (lymphadenopathy), the liver (hepatomegaly), and the spleen (splenomegaly).People with ALPS have an increased risk of developing cancer of the immune system cells (lymphoma) and may also be at increased risk of developing other cancers.Autoimmune disorders are also common in ALPS. Autoimmune disorders occur when the immune system malfunctions and attacks the body's own tissues and organs. Most of the autoimmune disorders associated with ALPS target and damage blood cells. For example, the immune system may attack red blood cells (autoimmune hemolytic anemia), white blood cells (autoimmune neutropenia), or platelets (autoimmune thrombocytopenia). Less commonly, autoimmune disorders that affect other organs and tissues occur in people with ALPS. These disorders can damage the kidneys (glomerulonephritis), liver (autoimmune hepatitis), eyes (uveitis), nerves (Guillain-Barre syndrome), or the connective tissues (systemic lupus erythematosus) that provide strength and flexibility to structures throughout the body.Skin problems, usually rashes or hives (urticaria), can occur in ALPS. Occasionally, affected individuals develop hardened skin with painful lumps or patches (panniculitis). Other rare signs and symptoms of ALPS include joint inflammation (arthritis), inflammation of blood vessels (vasculitis), mouth sores (oral ulcers), or an early loss of ovarian function (premature ovarian failure) may also occur in this disorder. Affected individuals can also develop neurological damage (organic brain syndrome) with symptoms that may include headaches, seizures, or a decline in intellectual functions (dementia).ALPS can have different patterns of signs and symptoms, which are sometimes considered separate forms of the disorder. In the most common form, lymphoproliferation generally becomes apparent during childhood. Enlargement of the lymph nodes and spleen frequently occur in affected individuals. Autoimmune disorders typically develop several years later, most frequently as a combination of hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia, also called Evans syndrome. People with this classic form of ALPS have a greatly increased risk of developing lymphoma compared with the general population.Other types of ALPS are very rare. In some affected individuals, severe lymphoproliferation begins around the time of birth, and autoimmune disorders and lymphoma develop at an early age. People with this pattern of signs and symptoms generally do not live beyond childhood. Another form of ALPS involves lymphoproliferation and the tendency to develop systemic lupus erythematosus. Individuals with this form of the disorder do not have an enlarged spleen.Some people have signs and symptoms that resemble those of ALPS, but the specific pattern of these signs and symptoms or the genetic cause may be different than in other forms. Researchers disagree whether individuals with these non-classic forms should be considered to have ALPS or a separate condition.
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