ICD-10 Diagnosis Code D82.1

Di George's syndrome

Diagnosis Code D82.1

ICD-10: D82.1
Short Description: Di George's syndrome
Long Description: Di George's syndrome
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code D82.1

Valid for Submission
The code D82.1 is valid for submission for HIPAA-covered transactions.

Code Classification
  • Diseases of the blood and blood-forming organs and certain disorders involving the immune mechanism (D50–D89)
    • Certain disorders involving the immune mechanism (D80-D89)
      • Immunodeficiency associated with other major defects (D82)

Information for Medical Professionals

Diagnostic Related Groups
The diagnosis code D82.1 is grouped in the following Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG V34.0)

  • 808 - MAJOR HEMATOLOGICAL AND IMMUNOLOGICAL DIAGNOSES EXCEPT SICKLE CELL CRISIS AND COAGULATION DISORDERS WITH
  • 809 - MAJOR HEMATOLOGICAL AND IMMUNOLOGICAL DIAGNOSES EXCEPT SICKLE CELL CRISIS AND COAGULATION DISORDERS WITH
  • 810 - MAJOR HEMATOLOGICAL AND IMMUNOLOGICAL DIAGNOSES EXCEPT SICKLE CELL CRISIS AND COAGULATION DISORDERS WITH

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The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

Synonyms
  • 22q11 microdeletion with complete DiGeorge sequence
  • 22q11 partial monosomy syndrome
  • Aplasia of thymus
  • Aplasia of thymus gland with immunodeficiency
  • DiGeorge sequence
  • Dysplasia of thymus gland with immunodeficiency
  • Thymic aplasia or dysplasia with immunodeficiency

Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code D82.1 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:


Information for Patients


Immune System and Disorders

Your immune system is a complex network of cells, tissues, and organs that work together to defend against germs. It helps your body to recognize these "foreign" invaders. Then its job is to keep them out, or if it can't, to find and destroy them.

If your immune system cannot do its job, the results can be serious. Disorders of the immune system include

  • Allergy and asthma - immune responses to substances that are usually not harmful
  • Immune deficiency diseases - disorders in which the immune system is missing one or more of its parts
  • Autoimmune diseases - diseases causing your immune system to attack your own body's cells and tissues by mistake

NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

  • Agammaglobulinemia
  • Aging changes in immunity
  • Chronic granulomatous disease
  • Graft-versus-host disease
  • Histiocytosis
  • Hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome
  • Immune response
  • Immunodeficiency disorders
  • Selective deficiency of IgA


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22q11.2 deletion syndrome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (which is also known by several other names, listed below) is a disorder caused by the deletion of a small piece of chromosome 22. The deletion occurs near the middle of the chromosome at a location designated q11.2.22q11.2 deletion syndrome has many possible signs and symptoms that can affect almost any part of the body. The features of this syndrome vary widely, even among affected members of the same family. Common signs and symptoms include heart abnormalities that are often present from birth, an opening in the roof of the mouth (a cleft palate), and distinctive facial features. People with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome often experience recurrent infections caused by problems with the immune system, and some develop autoimmune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis and Graves disease in which the immune system attacks the body's own tissues and organs. Affected individuals may also have breathing problems, kidney abnormalities, low levels of calcium in the blood (which can result in seizures), a decrease in blood platelets (thrombocytopenia), significant feeding difficulties, gastrointestinal problems, and hearing loss. Skeletal differences are possible, including mild short stature and, less frequently, abnormalities of the spinal bones.Many children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome have developmental delays, including delayed growth and speech development, and learning disabilities. Later in life, they are at an increased risk of developing mental illnesses such as schizophrenia, depression, anxiety, and bipolar disorder. Additionally, affected children are more likely than children without 22q11.2 deletion syndrome to have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and developmental conditions such as autism spectrum disorders that affect communication and social interaction.Because the signs and symptoms of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome are so varied, different groupings of features were once described as separate conditions. Doctors named these conditions DiGeorge syndrome, velocardiofacial syndrome (also called Shprintzen syndrome), and conotruncal anomaly face syndrome. In addition, some children with the 22q11.2 deletion were diagnosed with the autosomal dominant form of Opitz G/BBB syndrome and Cayler cardiofacial syndrome. Once the genetic basis for these disorders was identified, doctors determined that they were all part of a single syndrome with many possible signs and symptoms. To avoid confusion, this condition is usually called 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, a description based on its underlying genetic cause.
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