ICD-10 Diagnosis Code D69.42

Congenital and hereditary thrombocytopenia purpura

Diagnosis Code D69.42

ICD-10: D69.42
Short Description: Congenital and hereditary thrombocytopenia purpura
Long Description: Congenital and hereditary thrombocytopenia purpura
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code D69.42

Code Classification
  • Diseases of the blood and blood-forming organs and certain disorders involving the immune mechanism
    • Coagulation defects, purpura and other hemorrhagic conditions (D65-D69)
      • Purpura and other hemorrhagic conditions (D69)

Information for Medical Professionals

Convert to ICD-9 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.
  • 287.33 - Cong/herid thromb purpra

  • Amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia with congenital malformation
  • Congenital thrombocytopenic purpura
  • Hereditary thrombocytopenic disorder
  • Sex-linked thrombocytopenia
  • Thrombocytopenia due to defective platelet production

Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code D69.42 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:

Information for Patients

Platelet Disorders

Also called: Thrombocyte disorders

Platelets are little pieces of blood cells. Platelets help wounds heal and prevent bleeding by forming blood clots. Your bone marrow makes platelets. Problems can result from having too few or too many platelets, or from platelets that do not work properly.

If your blood has a low number of platelets, it is called thrombocytopenia. This can put you at risk for mild to serious bleeding. If your blood has too many platelets, you may have a higher risk of blood clots. With other platelet disorders, the platelets do not work as they should. For example, in von Willebrand Disease, the platelets cannot stick together or cannot attach to blood vessel walls. This can cause excessive bleeding.

Treatment of platelet disorders depends on the cause.

NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  • Bleeding time
  • Congenital platelet function defects
  • Glanzmann disease
  • Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP)
  • Partial thromboplastin time (PTT)
  • Platelet aggregation test
  • Primary thrombocythemia
  • Purpura
  • Thrombocytopenia
  • Thromobocytopenia - drug-induced

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X-linked thrombocytopenia X-linked thrombocytopenia is a bleeding disorder that primarily affects males. This condition is characterized by a blood cell abnormality called thrombocytopenia, which is a shortage in the number of cells involved in clotting (platelets). Affected individuals often have abnormally small platelets as well, a condition called microthrombocytopenia. X-linked thrombocytopenia can cause individuals to bruise easily or have episodes of prolonged bleeding following minor trauma or even in the absence of injury (spontaneous bleeding). Some people with this condition experience spontaneous bleeding in the brain (cerebral hemorrhage), which can cause brain damage that can be life-threatening.Some people with X-linked thrombocytopenia also have patches of red, irritated skin (eczema) or an increased susceptibility to infections. In severe cases, additional features can develop, such as cancer or autoimmune disorders, which occur when the immune system malfunctions and attacks the body's own tissues and organs. It is unclear, however, if people with these features have X-linked thrombocytopenia or a more severe disorder with similar signs and symptoms called Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome.Some people have a mild form of the disorder called intermittent thrombocytopenia. These individuals have normal platelet production at times with episodes of thrombocytopenia.
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Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura is a rare disorder that causes blood clots (thrombi) to form in small blood vessels throughout the body. These clots can cause serious medical problems if they block vessels and restrict blood flow to organs such as the brain, kidneys, and heart. Resulting complications can include neurological problems (such as personality changes, headaches, confusion, and slurred speech), fever, abnormal kidney function, abdominal pain, and heart problems.Blood clots normally form to prevent excess blood loss at the site of an injury. In people with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, clots develop in blood vessels even in the absence of injury. Blood clots are formed from clumps of cell fragments called platelets, which circulate in the blood and assist with clotting. Because a large number of platelets are used to make clots in people with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, fewer platelets are available in the bloodstream. A reduced level of circulating platelets is known as thrombocytopenia. Thrombocytopenia can lead to small areas of bleeding just under the surface of the skin, resulting in purplish spots called purpura.This disorder also causes red blood cells to break down (undergo hemolysis) prematurely. As blood squeezes past clots within blood vessels, red blood cells can break apart. A condition called hemolytic anemia occurs when red blood cells are destroyed faster than the body can replace them. This type of anemia leads to paleness, yellowing of the eyes and skin (jaundice), fatigue, shortness of breath, and a rapid heart rate.There are two major forms of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, an acquired (noninherited) form and a familial form. The acquired form usually appears in late childhood or adulthood. Affected individuals may have a single episode of signs and symptoms, or they may recur over time. The familial form of this disorder is much rarer and typically appears in infancy or early childhood. In people with the familial form, signs and symptoms often recur on a regular basis.
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