ICD-10 Diagnosis Code D69.3

Immune thrombocytopenic purpura

Diagnosis Code D69.3

ICD-10: D69.3
Short Description: Immune thrombocytopenic purpura
Long Description: Immune thrombocytopenic purpura
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code D69.3

Code Classification
  • Diseases of the blood and blood-forming organs and certain disorders involving the immune mechanism
    • Coagulation defects, purpura and other hemorrhagic conditions (D65-D69)
      • Purpura and other hemorrhagic conditions (D69)

Information for Medical Professionals

Convert to ICD-9 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Acute idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura
  • Autoimmune thrombocytopenia
  • Chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura
  • Cyclic thrombocytopenia
  • Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura
  • Immune thrombocytopenic purpura

Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code D69.3 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:

Information for Patients

Platelet Disorders

Also called: Thrombocyte disorders

Platelets are little pieces of blood cells. Platelets help wounds heal and prevent bleeding by forming blood clots. Your bone marrow makes platelets. Problems can result from having too few or too many platelets, or from platelets that do not work properly.

If your blood has a low number of platelets, it is called thrombocytopenia. This can put you at risk for mild to serious bleeding. If your blood has too many platelets, you may have a higher risk of blood clots. With other platelet disorders, the platelets do not work as they should. For example, in von Willebrand Disease, the platelets cannot stick together or cannot attach to blood vessel walls. This can cause excessive bleeding.

Treatment of platelet disorders depends on the cause.

NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  • Bleeding time
  • Congenital platelet function defects
  • Glanzmann disease
  • Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP)
  • Partial thromboplastin time (PTT)
  • Platelet aggregation test
  • Primary thrombocythemia
  • Purpura
  • Thrombocytopenia
  • Thromobocytopenia - drug-induced

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Immune thrombocytopenia Immune thrombocytopenia is a disorder characterized by a blood abnormality called thrombocytopenia, which is a shortage of blood cells called platelets that are involved in clotting.Affected individuals can develop frequent bruising or red or purple spots (purpura) on the skin caused by bleeding just under the skin's surface. People with immune thrombocytopenia can have significant bleeding episodes, such as nose bleeds (epistaxis) or bleeding in the moist lining (mucosae) of the mouth. In severe cases, individuals may have gastrointestinal bleeding or heavy or prolonged menstrual bleeding (menorrhagia). In very rare instances, bleeding inside the skull (intracranial hemorrhage) can occur, which can be life-threatening. A greater reduction in platelet numbers is often associated with more frequent bleeding episodes and an increased risk of severe bleeding.While immune thrombocytopenia can be diagnosed at any time, there are two periods when the condition is most likely to develop: early childhood and late adulthood. In children, the reduction in platelets is usually sudden, but platelet levels usually return to normal levels within weeks to months. Immune thrombocytopenia in children is often preceded by a minor infection, such as an upper respiratory infection, but the relationship between the infection and immune thrombocytopenia is not clear. In adults, the development of immune thrombocytopenia is gradual and the condition tends to persist throughout life.
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