ICD-10 Diagnosis Code D67

Hereditary factor IX deficiency

Diagnosis Code D67

ICD-10: D67
Short Description: Hereditary factor IX deficiency
Long Description: Hereditary factor IX deficiency
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code D67

Valid for Submission
The code D67 is valid for submission for HIPAA-covered transactions.

Code Classification
  • Diseases of the blood and blood-forming organs and certain disorders involving the immune mechanism (D50–D89)
    • Coagulation defects, purpura and other hemorrhagic conditions (D65-D69)
      • Hereditary factor IX deficiency (D67)

Information for Medical Professionals

Convert to ICD-9 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.
  • 286.1 - Cong factor IX disorder

Synonyms
  • Congenital factor IX deficiency variant
  • Congenital factor IX deficiency with inhibitor
  • Congenital factor IX deficiency without inhibitor
  • Hereditary factor IX deficiency disease
  • Hereditary factor IX deficiency disease with inhibitor
  • Hereditary factor IX deficiency disease without inhibitor
  • Mild hereditary factor IX deficiency disease with inhibitor
  • Mild hereditary factor IX deficiency disease without inhibitor
  • Moderate hereditary factor IX deficiency disease with inhibitor
  • Moderate hereditary factor IX deficiency disease without inhibitor
  • Severe hereditary factor IX deficiency disease with inhibitor
  • Severe hereditary factor IX deficiency disease without inhibitor

Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code D67 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:


Information for Patients


Hemophilia

Also called: Christmas disease, Factor IX deficiency, Factor VIII deficiency

Hemophilia is a rare disorder in which the blood does not clot normally. It is usually inherited. Hemophilia usually occurs in males.

If you have hemophilia, you have little or no clotting factor. Clotting factor is a protein needed for normal blood clotting. Without it, you may bleed for a long time after an injury or accident. You also may bleed into your knees, ankles, and elbows. Bleeding in the joints causes pain and, if not treated, can lead to arthritis. Bleeding in the brain, a very serious complication of hemophilia, requires emergency treatment.

The main symptoms of hemophilia are excessive bleeding and easy bruising. Blood tests can tell if you have it. The main treatment is injecting the missing clotting factor into the bloodstream. You may need it on a regular basis, or just when bleeding occurs.

NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  • Hemophilia (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Hemophilia A (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Hemophilia B (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Partial thromboplastin time (PTT) (Medical Encyclopedia)


[Read More]

Hemophilia Hemophilia is a bleeding disorder that slows the blood clotting process. People with this condition experience prolonged bleeding or oozing following an injury, surgery, or having a tooth pulled. In severe cases of hemophilia, continuous bleeding occurs after minor trauma or even in the absence of injury (spontaneous bleeding). Serious complications can result from bleeding into the joints, muscles, brain, or other internal organs. Milder forms of hemophilia do not necessarily involve spontaneous bleeding, and the condition may not become apparent until abnormal bleeding occurs following surgery or a serious injury.The major types of this condition are hemophilia A (also known as classic hemophilia or factor VIII deficiency) and hemophilia B (also known as Christmas disease or factor IX deficiency). Although the two types have very similar signs and symptoms, they are caused by mutations in different genes. People with an unusual form of hemophilia B, known as hemophilia B Leyden, experience episodes of excessive bleeding in childhood but have few bleeding problems after puberty.
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