ICD-10 Diagnosis Code D46.C

Myelodysplastic syndrome w isolated del(5q) chromsoml abnlt

Diagnosis Code D46.C

ICD-10: D46.C
Short Description: Myelodysplastic syndrome w isolated del(5q) chromsoml abnlt
Long Description: Myelodysplastic syndrome with isolated del(5q) chromosomal abnormality
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code D46.C

Code Classification
  • Neoplasms
    • Neoplasms of uncertain behavior, polycythemia vera and myelodysplastic syndromes (D37-D48)
      • Myelodysplastic syndromes (D46)

Information for Medical Professionals

Diagnostic Related Groups
The diagnosis code D46.C is grouped in the following Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG v33.0)


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The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.
  • 238.74 - Myelodyspls syn w 5q del

  • Myelodysplastic syndrome with isolated del

Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code D46.C in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:

Information for Patients

Myelodysplastic Syndromes

Also called: MDS

Your bone marrow is the spongy tissue inside some of your bones, such as your hip and thigh bones. It contains immature cells, called stem cells. The stem cells can develop into the red blood cells that carry oxygen through your body, the white blood cells that fight infections, and the platelets that help with blood clotting. If you have a myelodysplastic syndrome, the stem cells do not mature into healthy blood cells. Many of them die in the bone marrow. This means that you do not have enough healthy cells, which can lead to infection, anemia, or easy bleeding.

Myelodysplastic syndromes often do not cause early symptoms and are sometimes found during a routine blood test. If you have symptoms, they may include

  • Shortness of breath
  • Weakness or feeling tired
  • Skin that is paler than usual
  • Easy bruising or bleeding
  • Pinpoint spots under the skin caused by bleeding
  • Fever or frequent infections

Myelodysplastic syndromes are rare. People at higher risk are over 60, have had chemotherapy or radiation therapy, or have been exposed to certain chemicals. Treatment options include transfusions, drug therapy, chemotherapy, and blood or bone marrow stem cell transplants.

NIH: National Cancer Institute

  • Bone marrow transplant
  • Bone marrow transplant - discharge

[Read More]

5q minus syndrome 5q minus (5q-) syndrome is a type of bone marrow disorder called myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). MDS comprises a group of conditions in which immature blood cells fail to develop normally, resulting in too many immature cells and too few normal mature blood cells. In 5q- syndrome, development of red blood cells is particularly affected, leading to a shortage of these cells (anemia). In addition, the red blood cells that are present are unusually large (macrocytic). Although many people with 5q- syndrome have no symptoms related to anemia, especially in the early stages of the condition, some affected individuals develop extreme tiredness (fatigue), weakness, and an abnormally pale appearance (pallor) as the condition worsens. Individuals with 5q- syndrome also have abnormal development of bone marrow cells called megakaryocytes, which produce platelets, the cell fragments involved in blood clotting. A common finding in people with 5q- syndrome is abnormal cells described as hypolobated megakaryocytes. In addition, some individuals with 5q- syndrome have an excess of platelets, while others have normal numbers of platelets.MDS is considered a slow-growing (chronic) blood cancer. It can progress to a fast-growing blood cancer called acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Progression to AML occurs less commonly in people with 5q- syndrome than in those with other forms of MDS.
[Read More]
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