ICD-10 Diagnosis Code D30.0

Benign neoplasm of kidney

Diagnosis Code D30.0

ICD-10: D30.0
Short Description: Benign neoplasm of kidney
Long Description: Benign neoplasm of kidney
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code D30.0

Code Classification
  • Neoplasms
    • Benign neoplasms, except benign neuroendocrine tumors (D10-D36)
      • Benign neoplasm of urinary organs (D30)

Information for Medical Professionals

Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code D30.0 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:

Information for Patients

Benign Tumors

Also called: Benign cancer, Benign neoplasms, Noncancerous tumors

Tumors are abnormal growths in your body. They can be either benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer. Malignant ones are. Benign tumors grow only in one place. They cannot spread or invade other parts of your body. Even so, they can be dangerous if they press on vital organs, such as your brain.

Tumors are made up of extra cells. Normally, cells grow and divide to form new cells as your body needs them. When cells grow old, they die, and new cells take their place. Sometimes, this process goes wrong. New cells form when your body does not need them, and old cells do not die when they should. These extra cells can divide without stopping and may form tumor.

Treatment often involves surgery. Benign tumors usually don't grow back.

NIH: National Cancer Institute

  • Biopsy - polyps
  • Cherry angioma

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Kidney Diseases

Also called: Renal disease

You have two kidneys, each about the size of your fist. They are near the middle of your back, just below the rib cage. Inside each kidney there are about a million tiny structures called nephrons. They filter your blood. They remove wastes and extra water, which become urine. The urine flows through tubes called ureters. It goes to your bladder, which stores the urine until you go to the bathroom.

Most kidney diseases attack the nephrons. This damage may leave kidneys unable to remove wastes. Causes can include genetic problems, injuries, or medicines. You have a higher risk of kidney disease if you have diabetes, high blood pressure, or a close family member with kidney disease. Chronic kidney disease damages the nephrons slowly over several years. Other kidney problems include

  • Cancer
  • Cysts
  • Stones
  • Infections

Your doctor can do blood and urine tests to check if you have kidney disease. If your kidneys fail, you will need dialysis or a kidney transplant.

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  • ACE inhibitors
  • Acute nephritic syndrome
  • Analgesic nephropathy
  • Atheroembolic renal disease
  • Bartter syndrome
  • Bilateral hydronephrosis
  • Congenital nephrotic syndrome
  • Distal renal tubular acidosis
  • Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis
  • Glomerulonephritis
  • Goodpasture syndrome
  • IgA nephropathy
  • Injury - kidney and ureter
  • Interstitial nephritis
  • Kidney removal
  • Kidney removal - discharge
  • Medicines and Kidney Disease - NIH (National Kidney Disease Education Program)
  • Membranoproliferative GN I
  • Membranous nephropathy
  • Minimal change disease
  • Nephrocalcinosis
  • Nephrotic syndrome
  • Obstructive uropathy
  • Perirenal abscess
  • Proximal renal tubular acidosis
  • Reflux nephropathy
  • Renal papillary necrosis
  • Renal perfusion scintiscan
  • Renal vein thrombosis
  • Unilateral hydronephrosis

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