ICD-10 Diagnosis Code D12.6

Benign neoplasm of colon, unspecified

Diagnosis Code D12.6

ICD-10: D12.6
Short Description: Benign neoplasm of colon, unspecified
Long Description: Benign neoplasm of colon, unspecified
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code D12.6

Code Classification
  • Neoplasms
    • Benign neoplasms, except benign neuroendocrine tumors (D10-D36)
      • Benign neoplasm of colon, rectum, anus and anal canal (D12)

Information for Medical Professionals

Diagnostic Related Groups
The diagnosis code D12.6 is grouped in the following Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG v33.0)


Convert to ICD-9 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Adenoma of large intestine
  • Adenomatous polyp of colon
  • Benign lymphoid polyposis of intestine
  • Benign neoplasm of colon
  • Benign neoplasm of large intestine
  • Brock-Suckow polyposis syndrome
  • Dysplasia of colon
  • Dysplasia of large intestine
  • Familial multiple polyposis syndrome
  • Gardner syndrome
  • Inflammatory polyposis of intestine
  • Intestinal polyposis syndrome
  • Metaplastic polyposis of intestine
  • Mild dysplasia of colon
  • Moderate dysplasia of colon
  • MYH-associated polyposis
  • Nonfamilial multiple polyposis syndrome
  • Pseudopolyposis of colon
  • Severe dysplasia of colon
  • Tubular adenoma
  • Tubular adenoma of colon
  • Turcot syndrome
  • Villous adenoma of colon

Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code D12.6 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:

Information for Patients

Benign Tumors

Also called: Benign cancer, Benign neoplasms, Noncancerous tumors

Tumors are abnormal growths in your body. They can be either benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer. Malignant ones are. Benign tumors grow only in one place. They cannot spread or invade other parts of your body. Even so, they can be dangerous if they press on vital organs, such as your brain.

Tumors are made up of extra cells. Normally, cells grow and divide to form new cells as your body needs them. When cells grow old, they die, and new cells take their place. Sometimes, this process goes wrong. New cells form when your body does not need them, and old cells do not die when they should. These extra cells can divide without stopping and may form tumor.

Treatment often involves surgery. Benign tumors usually don't grow back.

NIH: National Cancer Institute

  • Biopsy - polyps
  • Cherry angioma

[Read More]

Colonic Diseases

Also called: Large intestine diseases

Your colon, also known as the large intestine, is part of your digestive system. It's a long, hollow tube at the end of your digestive tract where your body makes and stores stool. Many disorders affect the colon's ability to work properly. Some of these include

  • Colorectal cancer
  • Colonic polyps - extra tissue growing in the colon that can become cancerous
  • Ulcerative colitis - ulcers of the colon and rectum
  • Diverticulitis - inflammation or infection of pouches in the colon
  • Irritable bowel syndrome - an uncomfortable condition causing abdominal cramping and other symptoms

Treatment for colonic diseases varies greatly depending on the disease and its severity. Treatment may involve diet, medicines and in some cases, surgery.

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  • Angiodysplasia of the colon
  • Colitis
  • Colonoscopy
  • Hirschsprung disease
  • Intestinal ischemia and infarction
  • Large bowel resection
  • Lower GI Series - NIH (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases)

[Read More]

Juvenile polyposis syndrome Juvenile polyposis syndrome is a disorder characterized by multiple noncancerous (benign) growths called juvenile polyps. People with juvenile polyposis syndrome typically develop polyps before age 20; however, in the name of this condition "juvenile" refers to the characteristics of the tissues that make up the polyp, not the age of the affected individual. These growths occur in the gastrointestinal tract, typically in the large intestine (colon). The number of polyps varies from only a few to hundreds, even among affected members of the same family. Polyps may cause gastrointestinal bleeding, a shortage of red blood cells (anemia), abdominal pain, and diarrhea. Approximately 15 percent of people with juvenile polyposis syndrome have other abnormalities, such as a twisting of the intestines (intestinal malrotation), heart or brain abnormalities, an opening in the roof of the mouth (cleft palate), extra fingers or toes (polydactyly), and abnormalities of the genitalia or urinary tract.Juvenile polyposis syndrome is diagnosed when a person has any one of the following: (1) more than five juvenile polyps of the colon or rectum; (2) juvenile polyps in other parts of the gastrointestinal tract; or (3) any number of juvenile polyps and one or more affected family members. Single juvenile polyps are relatively common in children and are not characteristic of juvenile polyposis syndrome.Three types of juvenile polyposis syndrome have been described, based on the signs and symptoms of the disorder. Juvenile polyposis of infancy is characterized by polyps that occur throughout the gastrointestinal tract during infancy. Juvenile polyposis of infancy is the most severe form of the disorder and is associated with the poorest outcome. Children with this type may develop a condition called protein-losing enteropathy. This condition results in severe diarrhea, failure to gain weight and grow at the expected rate (failure to thrive), and general wasting and weight loss (cachexia). Another type called generalized juvenile polyposis is diagnosed when polyps develop throughout the gastrointestinal tract. In the third type, known as juvenile polyposis coli, affected individuals develop polyps only in their colon. People with generalized juvenile polyposis and juvenile polyposis coli typically develop polyps during childhood.Most juvenile polyps are benign, but there is a chance that polyps can become cancerous (malignant). It is estimated that people with juvenile polyposis syndrome have a 10 to 50 percent risk of developing a cancer of the gastrointestinal tract. The most common type of cancer seen in people with juvenile polyposis syndrome is colorectal cancer.
[Read More]
Previous Code
Previous Code D12.5
Next Code
D12.7 Next Code