ICD-10 Diagnosis Code D00

Carcinoma in situ of oral cavity, esophagus and stomach

Diagnosis Code D00

ICD-10: D00
Short Description: Carcinoma in situ of oral cavity, esophagus and stomach
Long Description: Carcinoma in situ of oral cavity, esophagus and stomach
This is the 2018 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code D00

Not Valid for Submission
The code D00 is a "header" and not valid for submission for HIPAA-covered transactions.

Code Classification
  • Neoplasms (C00–D48)
    • In situ neoplasms (D00-D09)
      • Carcinoma in situ of oral cavity, esophagus and stomach (D00)

Information for Patients


Esophageal Cancer

The esophagus is a hollow tube that carries food and liquids from your throat to your stomach. Early esophageal cancer usually does not cause symptoms. Later, you may have symptoms such as

  • Painful or difficult swallowing
  • Weight loss
  • A hoarse voice or cough that doesn't go away

You're at greater risk for getting esophageal cancer if you smoke, drink heavily, or have acid reflux. Your risk also goes up as you age

Your doctor uses imaging tests and a biopsy to diagnose esophageal cancer. Treatments include surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy. You might also need nutritional support, since the cancer or treatment may make it hard to swallow.

NIH: National Cancer Institute

  • Coughing up blood (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Diet and eating after esophagectomy (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Esophageal cancer (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Esophagectomy - minimally invasive (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Esophagectomy - open (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Swallowing problems (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Understanding Chemotherapy - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)
  • What to Know about Brachytherapy (A Type of Internal Radiation Therapy) - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)
  • What to Know about External Beam Radiation Therapy - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)


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Oral Cancer

Oral cancer can form in any part of the mouth. Most oral cancers begin in the flat cells that cover the surfaces of your mouth, tongue, and lips. Anyone can get oral cancer, but the risk is higher if you are male, use tobacco, drink lots of alcohol, have HPV, or have a history of head or neck cancer. Frequent sun exposure is also a risk factor for lip cancer.

Symptoms of oral cancer include

  • White or red patches in your mouth
  • A mouth sore that won't heal
  • Bleeding in your mouth
  • Loose teeth
  • Problems or pain with swallowing
  • A lump in your neck
  • An earache

Tests to diagnose oral cancer include a physical exam, endoscopy, biopsy, and imaging tests. Oral cancer treatments may include surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy. Some patients have a combination of treatments.

NIH: National Cancer Institute

  • Head and Neck Radiation Treatment and Your Mouth - NIH (National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research)
  • Leukoplakia (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Oral cancer (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Oral Cancer - NIH (National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research)
  • Swallowing problems (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Tongue biopsy (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Understanding Chemotherapy - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)
  • What to Know about External Beam Radiation Therapy - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)


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Stomach Cancer

Also called: Gastric cancer

The stomach is an organ between the esophagus and the small intestine. It mixes food with stomach acid and helps digest protein. Stomach cancer mostly affects older people - two-thirds of people who have it are over age 65. Your risk of getting it is also higher if you

  • Have had a Helicobacter pylori infection
  • Have had stomach inflammation
  • Are a man
  • Eat lots of salted, smoked, or pickled foods
  • Smoke cigarettes
  • Have a family history of stomach cancer

It is hard to diagnose stomach cancer in its early stages. Indigestion and stomach discomfort can be symptoms of early cancer, but other problems can cause the same symptoms. In advanced cases, there may be blood in your stool, vomiting, unexplained weight loss, jaundice, or trouble swallowing. Doctors diagnose stomach cancer with a physical exam, blood and imaging tests, an endoscopy, and a biopsy.

Because it is often found late, it can be hard to treat stomach cancer. Treatment options include surgery, chemotherapy, radiation or a combination.

NIH: National Cancer Institute

  • Abdominal radiation - discharge (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • After chemotherapy - discharge (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Gastrectomy (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Radiation enteritis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Stomach cancer (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Understanding Chemotherapy - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)
  • What to Know about External Beam Radiation Therapy - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)


[Read More]
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