ICD-10 Diagnosis Code C96

Oth & unsp malig neoplm of lymphoid, hematpoetc and rel tiss

Diagnosis Code C96

ICD-10: C96
Short Description: Oth & unsp malig neoplm of lymphoid, hematpoetc and rel tiss
Long Description: Other and unspecified malignant neoplasms of lymphoid, hematopoietic and related tissue
This is the 2018 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code C96

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The code C96 is a "header" and not valid for submission for HIPAA-covered transactions.

Code Classification
  • Neoplasms (C00–D48)
    • Malignant neoplasms of lymphoid, hematopoietic and related tissue (C81-C96)
      • Oth & unsp malig neoplm of lymphoid, hematpoetc and rel tiss (C96)

Information for Medical Professionals

Information for Patients


Leukemia

Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. These cells crowd out the healthy blood cells, making it hard for blood to do its work.

There are different types of leukemia, including

  • Acute lymphocytic leukemia
  • Acute myeloid leukemia
  • Chronic lymphocytic leukemia
  • Chronic myeloid leukemia

Leukemia can develop quickly or slowly. Chronic leukemia grows slowly. In acute leukemia, the cells are very abnormal and their number increases rapidly. Adults can get either type; children with leukemia most often have an acute type.Some leukemias can often be cured. Other types are hard to cure, but you can often control them. Treatments may include chemotherapy, radiation and stem cell transplantation. Even if symptoms disappear, you might need therapy to prevent a relapse.

NIH: National Cancer Institute

  • B-cell leukemia/lymphoma panel (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Bone marrow transplant (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Hairy cell leukemia (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Leukemia (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Understanding Chemotherapy - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)
  • What to Know about External Beam Radiation Therapy - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)


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Lymphoma

Also called: Non-Hodgkin lymphoma

Lymphoma is a cancer of a part of the immune system called the lymph system. There are many types of lymphoma. One type is Hodgkin disease. The rest are called non-Hodgkin lymphomas.

Non-Hodgkin lymphomas begin when a type of white blood cell, called a T cell or B cell, becomes abnormal. The cell divides again and again, making more and more abnormal cells. These abnormal cells can spread to almost any other part of the body. Most of the time, doctors don't know why a person gets non-Hodgkin lymphoma. You are at increased risk if you have a weakened immune system or have certain types of infections.

Non-Hodgkin lymphoma can cause many symptoms, such as

  • Swollen, painless lymph nodes in the neck, armpits or groin
  • Unexplained weight loss
  • Fever
  • Soaking night sweats
  • Coughing, trouble breathing or chest pain
  • Weakness and tiredness that don't go away
  • Pain, swelling or a feeling of fullness in the abdomen

Your doctor will diagnose lymphoma with a physical exam, blood tests, a chest x-ray, and a biopsy. Treatments include chemotherapy, radiation therapy, targeted therapy, biological therapy, or therapy to remove proteins from the blood. Targeted therapy uses substances that attack cancer cells without harming normal cells. Biologic therapy boosts your body's own ability to fight cancer. If you don't have symptoms, you may not need treatment right away. This is called watchful waiting.

NIH: National Cancer Institute

  • After chemotherapy - discharge (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • B-cell leukemia/lymphoma panel (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Bone marrow transplant (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Burkitt lymphoma (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Lymph node biopsy (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Non-Hodgkin lymphoma - children (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Understanding Chemotherapy - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)
  • What to Know about Brachytherapy (A Type of Internal Radiation Therapy) - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)
  • What to Know about External Beam Radiation Therapy - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)


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