ICD-10 Diagnosis Code B95

Strep as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere

Diagnosis Code B95

ICD-10: B95
Short Description: Strep as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere
Long Description: Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, and Enterococcus as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code B95

Code Classification
  • Certain infectious and parasitic diseases
    • Bacterial and viral infectious agents (B95-B97)
      • Strep as the cause of diseases classified elsewhere (B95)

Information for Patients

Bacterial Infections

Bacteria are living things that have only one cell. Under a microscope, they look like balls, rods, or spirals. They are so small that a line of 1,000 could fit across a pencil eraser. Most bacteria won't hurt you - less than 1 percent of the different types make people sick. Many are helpful. Some bacteria help to digest food, destroy disease-causing cells, and give the body needed vitamins. Bacteria are also used in making healthy foods like yogurt and cheese.

But infectious bacteria can make you ill. They reproduce quickly in your body. Many give off chemicals called toxins, which can damage tissue and make you sick. Examples of bacteria that cause infections include Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, and E. coli.

Antibiotics are the usual treatment. When you take antibiotics, follow the directions carefully. Each time you take antibiotics, you increase the chances that bacteria in your body will learn to resist them causing antibiotic resistance. Later, you could get or spread an infection that those antibiotics cannot cure.

NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

  • Actinomycosis
  • Bacterial vaginosis -- aftercare
  • Blood culture
  • Gram stain
  • Gram stain of skin lesion
  • Necrotizing soft tissue infection

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Staphylococcal Infections

Also called: Staph

Staph is short for Staphylococcus, a type of bacteria. There are over 30 types, but Staphylococcus aureus causes most staph infections (pronounced "staff infections"), including

  • Skin infections
  • Pneumonia
  • Food poisoning
  • Toxic shock syndrome
  • Blood poisoning (bacteremia)

Skin infections are the most common. They can look like pimples or boils. They may be red, swollen and painful, and sometimes have pus or other drainage. They can turn into impetigo, which turns into a crust on the skin, or cellulitis, a swollen, red area of skin that feels hot.

Anyone can get a staph skin infection. You are more likely to get one if you have a cut or scratch, or have contact with a person or surface that has staph bacteria. The best way to prevent staph is to keep hands and wounds clean. Most staph skin infections are easily treated with antibiotics or by draining the infection. Some staph bacteria such as MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) are resistant to certain antibiotics, making infections harder to treat.

  • Boils
  • Carbuncle
  • Scalded skin syndrome
  • Staph infections -- self-care at home
  • Toxic shock syndrome
  • Tracheitis

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Streptococcal Infections

Also called: Strep

Strep is short for Streptococcus, a type of bacteria. There are two types: group A and group B.

Group A strep causes

  • Strep throat - a sore, red throat, sometimes with white spots on the tonsils
  • Scarlet fever - an illness that follows strep throat. It causes a red rash on the body.
  • Impetigo - a skin infection
  • Toxic shock syndrome
  • Cellulitis and necrotizing fasciitis (flesh-eating disease)

Group B strep can cause blood infections, pneumonia and meningitis in newborns. A screening test during pregnancy can tell if you have it. If you do, I.V. antibiotics during labor can save your baby's life. Adults can also get group B strep infections, especially if they are elderly or already have health problems. Strep B can cause urinary tract infections, blood infections, skin infections and pneumonia in adults.

Antibiotics are used to treat strep infections.

NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

  • Ecthyma
  • Erysipelas
  • Group B streptococcal septicemia of the newborn
  • Group B streptococcus - pregnancy
  • Perianal streptococcal cellulitis
  • Rheumatic fever
  • Scarlet fever
  • Strep throat
  • Streptococcal screen
  • Throat swab culture
  • Toxic shock syndrome

[Read More]
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