ICD-10 Diagnosis Code B94.9

Sequelae of unspecified infectious and parasitic disease

Diagnosis Code B94.9

ICD-10: B94.9
Short Description: Sequelae of unspecified infectious and parasitic disease
Long Description: Sequelae of unspecified infectious and parasitic disease
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code B94.9

Code Classification
  • Certain infectious and parasitic diseases
    • Sequelae of infectious and parasitic diseases (B90-B94)
      • Sequelae of other and unsp infectious and parasitic diseases (B94)

Information for Medical Professionals

Diagnostic Related Groups
The diagnosis code B94.9 is grouped in the following Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG v33.0)


Convert to ICD-9 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

Present on Admission (POA) Additional informationCallout TooltipPresent on Admission
The Present on Admission (POA) indicator is used for diagnosis codes included in claims involving inpatient admissions to general acute care hospitals. POA indicators must be reported to CMS on each claim to facilitate the grouping of diagnoses codes into the proper Diagnostic Related Groups (DRG). CMS publishes a listing of specific diagnosis codes that are exempt from the POA reporting requirement.

The code B94.9 is exempt from POA reporting.

  • Infectious sequelae of disorders
  • Paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria
  • Post infectious grand mal epilepsy
  • Post-infectious glomerulonephritis
  • Post-infectious glomerulonephritis - Garland variety
  • Post-infective bronchiectasis
  • Post-infective hypopituitarism
  • Postviral depression
  • Post-viral paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria
  • Sequelae of infectious and parasitic diseases
  • Shunt nephritis

Information for Patients

Infectious Diseases

Also called: Communicable diseases

Infectious diseases kill more people worldwide than any other single cause. Infectious diseases are caused by germs. Germs are tiny living things that are found everywhere - in air, soil and water. You can get infected by touching, eating, drinking or breathing something that contains a germ. Germs can also spread through animal and insect bites, kissing and sexual contact. Vaccines, proper hand washing and medicines can help prevent infections.

There are four main kinds of germs:

  • Bacteria - one-celled germs that multiply quickly and may release chemicals which can make you sick
  • Viruses - capsules that contain genetic material, and use your own cells to multiply
  • Fungi - primitive plants, like mushrooms or mildew
  • Protozoa - one-celled animals that use other living things for food and a place to live

NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

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Parasitic Diseases

Parasites are living things that use other living things - like your body - for food and a place to live. You can get them from contaminated food or water, a bug bite, or sexual contact. Some parasitic diseases are easily treated and some are not.

Parasites range in size from tiny, one-celled organisms called protozoa to worms that can be seen with the naked eye. Some parasitic diseases occur in the United States. Contaminated water supplies can lead to Giardia infections. Cats can transmit toxoplasmosis, which is dangerous for pregnant women. Others, like malaria, are common in other parts of the world.

If you are traveling, it's important to drink only water you know is safe. Prevention is especially important. There are no vaccines for parasitic diseases. Some medicines are available to treat parasitic infections.

  • Amebiasis
  • Amebic liver abscess
  • Ascariasis
  • Creeping eruption
  • Stool ova and parasites exam
  • Taeniasis

[Read More]
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