ICD-10 Diagnosis Code A93.2

Colorado tick fever

Diagnosis Code A93.2

ICD-10: A93.2
Short Description: Colorado tick fever
Long Description: Colorado tick fever
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code A93.2

Valid for Submission
The code A93.2 is valid for submission for HIPAA-covered transactions.

Code Classification
  • Certain infectious and parasitic diseases (A00–B99)
    • Arthropod-borne viral fevers and viral hemorrhagic fevers (A90-A99)
      • Other arthropod-borne viral fevers, not elsewhere classified (A93)

Information for Patients


Tick Bites

If you spend time outdoors or have pets that go outdoors, you need to beware of ticks. Ticks are small bloodsucking parasites. Many species transmit diseases to animals and people. Some of the diseases you can get from a tick bite are Lyme disease, ehrlichiosis, Rocky Mountain spotted fever and tularemia.

Some ticks are so small that they can be difficult to see. Ticks may get on you if you walk through areas where they live, such as tall grass, leaf litter or shrubs.

Tick-borne diseases occur worldwide, including in your own backyard. To help protect yourself and your family, you should

  • Use a chemical repellent with DEET, permethrin or picaridin
  • Wear light-colored protective clothing
  • Tuck pant legs into socks
  • Avoid tick-infested areas
  • Check yourself, your children and your pets daily for ticks and carefully remove any ticks you find

  • Colorado tick fever (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Ehrlichiosis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Rocky Mountain spotted fever (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Tick bite (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Tick paralysis (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Tick removal (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Tularemia (Medical Encyclopedia)


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Viral Infections

Viruses are capsules with genetic material inside. They are very tiny, much smaller than bacteria. Viruses cause familiar infectious diseases such as the common cold, flu and warts. They also cause severe illnesses such as HIV/AIDS, smallpox and hemorrhagic fevers.

Viruses are like hijackers. They invade living, normal cells and use those cells to multiply and produce other viruses like themselves. This eventually kills the cells, which can make you sick.

Viral infections are hard to treat because viruses live inside your body's cells. They are "protected" from medicines, which usually move through your bloodstream. Antibiotics do not work for viral infections. There are a few antiviral medicines available. Vaccines can help prevent you from getting many viral diseases.

NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

  • ECHO virus (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Enterovirus D68 (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Hand-foot-mouth disease (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Herpangina (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Molluscum contagiosum (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Parainfluenza (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Roseola (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Zika virus disease (Medical Encyclopedia)


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