ICD-10 Diagnosis Code A69.29

Other conditions associated with Lyme disease

Diagnosis Code A69.29

ICD-10: A69.29
Short Description: Other conditions associated with Lyme disease
Long Description: Other conditions associated with Lyme disease
This is the 2018 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code A69.29

Valid for Submission
The code A69.29 is valid for submission for HIPAA-covered transactions.

Code Classification
  • Certain infectious and parasitic diseases (A00–B99)
    • Other spirochetal diseases (A65-A69)
      • Other spirochetal infections (A69)

Information for Medical Professionals

Diagnostic Related Groups
The diagnosis code A69.29 is grouped in the following Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG V34.0)

  • 867 - OTHER INFECTIOUS AND PARASITIC DISEASES DIAGNOSES WITH MCC
  • 868 - OTHER INFECTIOUS AND PARASITIC DISEASES DIAGNOSES WITH CC
  • 869 - OTHER INFECTIOUS AND PARASITIC DISEASES DIAGNOSES WITHOUT CC/MCC

Convert to ICD-9 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

Synonyms
  • Arthritis caused by spirochaetale infection
  • Bacterial keratitis
  • Infection involving inner ear
  • Infectious synovitis
  • Lyme arthritis
  • Lyme carditis
  • Lyme conjunctivitis
  • Lyme disease of inner ear
  • Lyme erosive synovitis
  • Lyme keratitis
  • Lyme uveitis
  • Skeletal Lyme disease

Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code A69.29 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:


Information for Patients


Lyme Disease

Lyme disease is a bacterial infection you get from the bite of an infected tick. The first symptom is usually a red rash, which may look like a bull's eye. But not all people with Lyme disease have a rash. As the infection spreads to other parts of the body, you may have

  • A fever
  • A headache
  • Body aches
  • A stiff neck
  • Fatigue

Lyme disease can be hard to diagnose because many of its symptoms are like those of the flu and other diseases. And you may not have noticed a tick bite. Your health care provider will look at your symptoms and medical history to figure out whether you have Lyme disease. Lab tests may not always give a clear answer until you have been infected for at least a few weeks.

Antibiotics can cure most cases of Lyme disease. The sooner treatment begins, the quicker and more complete the recovery.

After treatment, some patients may still have muscle or joint aches and nervous system symptoms. This is called post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome (PTLDS). Long-term antibiotics have not been shown to help with PTLDS. However, there are ways to help with the symptoms of PTLDS, and most patients do get better with time.

NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

  • Beware of Ticks … & Lyme Disease (Food and Drug Administration)
  • Lyme disease (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Lyme disease antibody (Medical Encyclopedia)


[Read More]
Previous Code
Previous Code A69.23
Next Code
A69.8 Next Code