ICD-10 Diagnosis Code A54.21

Gonococcal infection of kidney and ureter

Diagnosis Code A54.21

ICD-10: A54.21
Short Description: Gonococcal infection of kidney and ureter
Long Description: Gonococcal infection of kidney and ureter
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code A54.21

Code Classification
  • Certain infectious and parasitic diseases
    • Infections with a predominantly sexual mode of transmission (A50-A64)
      • Gonococcal infection (A54)

Information for Medical Professionals

Information for Patients


Also called: The clap

Gonorrhea is a sexually transmitted disease. It is most common in young adults. The bacteria that cause gonorrhea can infect the genital tract, mouth, or anus. You can get gonorrhea during vaginal, oral, or anal sex with an infected partner. A pregnant woman can pass it to her baby during childbirth.

Gonorrhea does not always cause symptoms. In men, gonorrhea can cause pain when urinating and discharge from the penis. If untreated, it can cause problems with the prostate and testicles.

In women, the early symptoms of gonorrhea often are mild. Later, it can cause bleeding between periods, pain when urinating, and increased discharge from the vagina. If untreated, it can lead to pelvic inflammatory disease, which causes problems with pregnancy and infertility.

Your health care provider will diagnose gonorrhea with lab tests. Treatment is with antibiotics. Treating gonorrhea is becoming more difficult because drug-resistant strains are increasing. Correct usage of latex condoms greatly reduces, but does not eliminate, the risk of catching or spreading gonorrhea.

NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

  • Condom Fact Sheet in Brief (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • Endocervical gram stain
  • Gonococcal arthritis
  • Gonorrhea (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • Gonorrhea
  • Rectal culture
  • Urethral discharge culture

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Urinary Tract Infections

Also called: UTI

The urinary system is the body's drainage system for removing wastes and extra water. It includes two kidneys, two ureters, a bladder, and a urethra. Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are the second most common type of infection in the body.

You may have a UTI if you notice

  • Pain or burning when you urinate
  • Fever, tiredness, or shakiness
  • An urge to urinate often
  • Pressure in your lower belly
  • Urine that smells bad or looks cloudy or reddish
  • Pain in your back or side below the ribs

People of any age or sex can get UTIs. But about four times as many women get UTIs as men. You're also at higher risk if you have diabetes, need a tube to drain your bladder, or have a spinal cord injury.

If you think you have a UTI it is important to see your doctor. Your doctor can tell if you have a UTI with a urine test. Treatment is with antibiotics.

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  • Asymptomatic bacteriuria
  • Catheter-associated UTI
  • Cystitis - acute
  • Leukocyte esterase urine test
  • Urinary tract infection - adults
  • Urinary tract infection - children
  • Urine - bloody
  • Urine culture

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