ICD-10 Diagnosis Code A51.32

Syphilitic alopecia

Diagnosis Code A51.32

ICD-10: A51.32
Short Description: Syphilitic alopecia
Long Description: Syphilitic alopecia
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code A51.32

Code Classification
  • Certain infectious and parasitic diseases
    • Infections with a predominantly sexual mode of transmission (A50-A64)
      • Early syphilis (A51)

Information for Medical Professionals

Diagnostic Related Groups
The diagnosis code A51.32 is grouped in the following Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG v33.0)


Convert to ICD-9 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Syphilitic alopecia
  • Syphilitic skin disorder

Information for Patients

Hair Loss

Also called: Alopecia

You lose up to 100 hairs from your scalp every day. That's normal, and in most people, those hairs grow back. But many men -- and some women -- lose hair as they grow older. You can also lose your hair if you have certain diseases, such as thyroid problems, diabetes, or lupus. If you take certain medicines or have chemotherapy for cancer, you may also lose your hair. Other causes are stress, a low protein diet, a family history, or poor nutrition.

Treatment for hair loss depends on the cause. In some cases, treating the underlying cause will correct the problem. Other treatments include medicines and hair restoration.

  • Alopecia areata
  • Coping with cancer -- hair loss
  • Female pattern baldness
  • Hair loss
  • Hair transplant
  • Male pattern baldness
  • Trichotillomania

[Read More]


Syphilis is a sexually transmitted disease caused by bacteria. It infects the genital area, lips, mouth, or anus of both men and women. You usually get syphilis from sexual contact with someone who has it. It can also pass from mother to baby during pregnancy.

The early stage of syphilis usually causes a single, small, painless sore. Sometimes it causes swelling in nearby lymph nodes. If you do not treat it, syphilis usually causes a non-itchy skin rash, often on your hands and feet. Many people do not notice symptoms for years. Symptoms can go away and come back.

The sores caused by syphilis make it easier to get or give someone HIV during sex. If you are pregnant, syphilis can cause birth defects, or you could lose your baby. In rare cases, syphilis causes serious health problems and even death.

Syphilis is easy to cure with antibiotics if you catch it early. Correct usage of latex condoms greatly reduces, but does not completely eliminate, the risk of catching or spreading syphilis.

NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

  • Condom Fact Sheet in Brief (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • Congenital syphilis
  • CSF-VDRL test
  • FTA-ABS test
  • Neurosyphilis
  • RPR test
  • Syphilis (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • Syphilis - primary
  • Syphilis and MSM (Men Who Have Sex with Men) (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • VDRL test

[Read More]
Previous Code
Previous Code A51.31
Next Code
A51.39 Next Code