ICD-10 Diagnosis Code A22.2

Gastrointestinal anthrax

Diagnosis Code A22.2

ICD-10: A22.2
Short Description: Gastrointestinal anthrax
Long Description: Gastrointestinal anthrax
This is the 2018 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code A22.2

Valid for Submission
The code A22.2 is valid for submission for HIPAA-covered transactions.

Code Classification
  • Certain infectious and parasitic diseases (A00–B99)
    • Certain zoonotic bacterial diseases (A20-A28)
      • Anthrax (A22)

Information for Medical Professionals

Diagnostic Related Groups
The diagnosis code A22.2 is grouped in the following Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG V34.0)

  • 371 - MAJOR GASTROINTESTINAL DISORDERS AND PERITONEAL INFECTIONS WITH MCC
  • 372 - MAJOR GASTROINTESTINAL DISORDERS AND PERITONEAL INFECTIONS WITH CC
  • 373 - MAJOR GASTROINTESTINAL DISORDERS AND PERITONEAL INFECTIONS WITHOUT CC/MCC

Convert to ICD-9 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.
  • 022.2 - Gastrointestinal anthrax

Synonyms
  • Anthrax
  • Bacterial infection caused by Bacillus
  • Gastrointestinal anthrax

Information for Patients


Anthrax

Anthrax is a disease caused by Bacillus anthracis, a germ that lives in soil. Many people know about it from the 2001 bioterror attacks. In the attacks, someone purposely spread anthrax through the U.S. mail. This killed five people and made 22 sick.

Anthrax is rare. It affects animals such as cattle, sheep, and goats more often than people. People can get anthrax from contact with infected animals, wool, meat, or hides. It can cause three forms of disease in people. They are

  • Cutaneous, which affects the skin. People with cuts or open sores can get it if they touch the bacteria.
  • Inhalation, which affects the lungs. You can get this if you breathe in spores of the bacteria.
  • Gastrointestinal, which affects the digestive system. You can get it by eating infected meat.

Antibiotics often cure anthrax if it is diagnosed early. But many people don't know they have anthrax until it is too late to treat. A vaccine to prevent anthrax is available for people in the military and others at high risk.

NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

  • Anthrax (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Anthrax - blood test (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Anthrax Vaccine: What You Need to Know (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)


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Digestive Diseases

Also called: Gastrointestinal diseases

When you eat, your body breaks food down to a form it can use to build and nourish cells and provide energy. This process is called digestion.

Your digestive system is a series of hollow organs joined in a long, twisting tube. It runs from your mouth to your anus and includes your esophagus, stomach, and small and large intestines. Your liver, gallbladder and pancreas are also involved. They produce juices to help digestion.

There are many types of digestive disorders. The symptoms vary widely depending on the problem. In general, you should see your doctor if you have

  • Blood in your stool
  • Changes in bowel habits
  • Severe abdominal pain
  • Unintentional weight loss
  • Heartburn not relieved by antacids

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  • Digestive diseases (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • EGD discharge (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Fecal fat (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Gastrointestinal fistula (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Gastrointestinal perforation (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Lower GI Series - NIH (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases)
  • Stools - floating (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Upper GI and small bowel series (Medical Encyclopedia)


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