ICD-10 Diagnosis Code A18.18

Tuberculosis of other female genital organs

Diagnosis Code A18.18

ICD-10: A18.18
Short Description: Tuberculosis of other female genital organs
Long Description: Tuberculosis of other female genital organs
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code A18.18

Valid for Submission
The code A18.18 is valid for submission for HIPAA-covered transactions.

Code Classification
  • Certain infectious and parasitic diseases (A00–B99)
    • Tuberculosis (A15-A19)
      • Tuberculosis of other organs (A18)

Information for Medical Professionals


Code Edits
The following edits are applicable to this code:
Diagnoses for females only Additional informationCallout TooltipDiagnoses for females only
Diagnoses for females only.


Diagnostic Related Groups
The diagnosis code A18.18 is grouped in the following Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG v33.0)

  • UTERINE AND ADNEXA PROCEDURES FOR NON-MALIGNANCY WITH CC/MCC 742
  • UTERINE AND ADNEXA PROCEDURES FOR NON-MALIGNANCY WITHOUT CC/MCC 743
  • INFECTIONS, FEMALE REPRODUCTIVE SYSTEM WITH MCC 757
  • INFECTIONS, FEMALE REPRODUCTIVE SYSTEM WITH CC 758
  • INFECTIONS, FEMALE REPRODUCTIVE SYSTEM WITHOUT CC/MCC 759
  • HIV WITH MAJOR RELATED CONDITION WITH MCC 974
  • HIV WITH MAJOR RELATED CONDITION WITH CC 975
  • HIV WITH MAJOR RELATED CONDITION WITHOUT CC/MCC 976

Convert to ICD-9 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

Synonyms
  • Female tuberculous pelvic inflammatory disease
  • Genital tuberculosis
  • Tuberculosis of female genital organs

Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code A18.18 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:


Information for Patients


Tuberculosis

Also called: TB

Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease caused by bacteria called Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The bacteria usually attack the lungs, but they can also damage other parts of the body.

TB spreads through the air when a person with TB of the lungs or throat coughs, sneezes, or talks. If you have been exposed, you should go to your doctor for tests. You are more likely to get TB if you have a weak immune system.

Symptoms of TB in the lungs may include

  • A bad cough that lasts 3 weeks or longer
  • Weight loss
  • Loss of appetite
  • Coughing up blood or mucus
  • Weakness or fatigue
  • Fever
  • Night sweats

Skin tests, blood tests, x-rays, and other tests can tell if you have TB. If not treated properly, TB can be deadly. You can usually cure active TB by taking several medicines for a long period of time.

NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

  • Acid-fast stain
  • Coughing up blood
  • Disseminated tuberculosis
  • Meningitis - tuberculous
  • Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis (MDR TB) (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • PPD skin test
  • Pulmonary tuberculosis
  • Taking medicines to treat tuberculosis
  • Tuberculosis Facts - Exposure to TB (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • Tuberculosis Facts - TB Can Be Treated (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • Tuberculosis Facts - Testing for TB (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • Tuberculosis Facts - You Can Prevent TB (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • Tuberculosis: General Information (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)


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Uterine Diseases

The uterus, or womb, is the place where a baby grows when a woman is pregnant. The first sign of a problem with the uterus may be bleeding between periods or after sex. Causes can include hormones, thyroid problems, fibroids, polyps, cancer, infection, or pregnancy.

Treatment depends on the cause. Sometimes birth control pills treat hormonal imbalances. If a thyroid problem is the cause, treating it may also stop the bleeding. If you have cancer or hyperplasia, an overgrowth of normal cells in the uterus, you may need surgery.

With two other uterine problems, tissue that normally lines the uterus grows where it is not supposed to. In endometriosis, it grows outside the uterus. In adenomyosis, it grows in the uterus's outside walls. Pain medicine may help. Other treatments include hormones and surgery.

  • Adenomyosis
  • Asherman syndrome
  • D and C
  • Endometrial ablation
  • Endometrial polyps
  • Endometritis
  • Hysteroscopy
  • Retroversion of the uterus


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Vaginal Diseases

Vaginal problems are some of the most common reasons women go to the doctor. They may have symptoms such as

  • Itching
  • Burning
  • Pain
  • Abnormal bleeding
  • Discharge

Often, the problem is vaginitis, an inflammation of the vagina. The main symptom is smelly vaginal discharge, but some women have no symptoms. Common causes are bacterial infections, trichomoniasis, and yeast infections.

Some other causes of vaginal symptoms include sexually transmitted diseases, vaginal cancer, and vulvar cancer. Treatment of vaginal problems depends on the cause.

  • Bacterial Vaginosis (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
  • Bacterial vaginosis -- aftercare
  • Bartholin cyst or abscess
  • Imperforate hymen
  • Vaginal cysts
  • Vaginal dryness
  • Vaginal itching and discharge - Adult and adolescent
  • Vaginal itching and discharge - child
  • Vaginal yeast infection
  • Vaginitis - self-care
  • Vulvovaginitis - overview


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