ICD-10 Diagnosis Code T43.611S

Poisoning by caffeine, accidental (unintentional), sequela

Diagnosis Code T43.611S

ICD-10: T43.611S
Short Description: Poisoning by caffeine, accidental (unintentional), sequela
Long Description: Poisoning by caffeine, accidental (unintentional), sequela
This is the 2018 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code T43.611S

Valid for Submission
The code T43.611S is valid for submission for HIPAA-covered transactions.

Code Classification
  • Injury, poisoning and certain other consequences of external causes (S00–T98)
    • Poisoning by, adverse effect of and underdosing of drugs, medicaments and biological substances (T36-T50)
      • Psychotropic drugs, not elsewhere classified (T43)

Information for Medical Professionals

Diagnostic Related Groups
The diagnosis code T43.611S is grouped in the following Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG V34.0)

  • 922 - OTHER INJURY, POISONING AND TOXIC EFFECT DIAGNOSES WITH MCC
  • 923 - OTHER INJURY, POISONING AND TOXIC EFFECT DIAGNOSES WITHOUT MCC

Convert to ICD-9 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

Present on Admission (POA) Additional informationCallout TooltipPresent on Admission
The Present on Admission (POA) indicator is used for diagnosis codes included in claims involving inpatient admissions to general acute care hospitals. POA indicators must be reported to CMS on each claim to facilitate the grouping of diagnoses codes into the proper Diagnostic Related Groups (DRG). CMS publishes a listing of specific diagnosis codes that are exempt from the POA reporting requirement.

The code T43.611S is exempt from POA reporting.

Synonyms
  • Accidental caffeine overdose
  • Accidental phosphodiesterase inhibitor overdose
  • Accidental phosphodiesterase inhibitor poisoning
  • Accidental poisoning caused by caffeine
  • Accidental poisoning caused by central nervous system stimulants
  • Accidental poisoning caused by psychostimulants
  • Caffeine overdose
  • Poisoning caused by caffeine
  • Respiratory stimulant overdose

Information for Patients


Caffeine

What is caffeine?

Caffeine is a bitter substance that occurs naturally in more than 60 plants including

  • Coffee beans
  • Tea leaves
  • Kola nuts, which are used to flavor soft drink colas
  • Cacao pods, which are used to make chocolate products

There is also synthetic (man-made) caffeine, which is added to some medicines, foods, and drinks. For example, some pain relievers, cold medicines, and over-the-counter medicines for alertness contain synthetic caffeine. So do energy drinks and "energy-boosting" gums and snacks.

Most people consume caffeine from drinks. The amounts of caffeine in different drinks can vary a lot, but it is generally

  • An 8-ounce cup of coffee: 95-200 mg
  • A 12-ounce can of cola: 35-45 mg
  • An 8-ounce energy drink: 70-100 mg
  • An 8-ounce cup of tea: 14-60 mg

What are caffeine's effects on the body?

Caffeine has many effects on your body's metabolism. It

  • Stimulates your central nervous system, which can make you feel more awake and give you a boost of energy
  • Is a diuretic, meaning that it helps your body get rid of extra salt and water by urinating more
  • Increases the release of acid in your stomach, sometimes leading to an upset stomach or heartburn
  • May interfere with the absorption of calcium in the body
  • Increases your blood pressure

Within one hour of eating or drinking caffeine, it reaches its peak level in your blood. You may continue to feel the effects of caffeine for four to six hours.

What are the side effects from too much caffeine?

For most people, it is not harmful to consume up to 400mg of caffeine a day. If you do eat or drink too much caffeine, it can cause health problems, such as

  • Restlessness and shakiness
  • Insomnia
  • Headaches
  • Dizziness
  • Rapid or abnormal heart rhythm
  • Dehydration
  • Anxiety
  • Dependency, so you need to take more of it to get the same results

Some people are more sensitive to the effects of caffeine than others.

What are energy drinks, and why can they be a problem?

Energy drinks are beverages that have added caffeine. The amount of caffeine in energy drinks can vary widely, and sometimes the labels on the drinks do not give you the actual amount of caffeine in them. Energy drinks may also contain sugars, vitamins, herbs, and supplements.

Companies that make energy drinks claim that the drinks can increase alertness and improve physical and mental performance. This has helped make the drinks popular with American teens and young adults. There's limited data showing that energy drinks might temporarily improve alertness and physical endurance. There is not enough evidence to show that they enhance strength or power. But what we do know is that energy drinks can be dangerous because they have large amounts of caffeine. And since they have lots of sugar, they can contribute to weight gain and worsen diabetes.

Sometimes young people mix their energy drinks with alcohol. It is dangerous to combine alcohol and caffeine. Caffeine can interfere with your ability to recognize how drunk you are, which can lead you to drink more. This also makes you more likely to make bad decisions.

Who should avoid or limit caffeine?

You should check with your health care provider about whether you should limit or avoid caffeine if you

  • Are pregnant, since caffeine passes through the placenta to your baby
  • Are breastfeeding, since a small amount of caffeine that you consume is passed along to your baby
  • Have sleep disorders, including insomnia
  • Have migraines or other chronic headaches
  • Have anxiety
  • Have GERD or ulcers
  • Have fast or irregular heart rhythms
  • Have high blood pressure
  • Take certain medicines or supplements, including stimulants, certain antibiotics, asthma medicines, and heart medicines. Check with your health care provider about whether there might be interactions between caffeine and any medicines and supplements that you take.
  • Are a child or teen. Neither should have as much caffeine as adults. Children can be especially sensitive to the effects of caffeine.

What is caffeine withdrawal?

If you have been consuming caffeine on a regular basis and then suddenly stop, you may have caffeine withdrawal. Symptoms can include

  • Headaches
  • Drowsiness
  • Irritability
  • Nausea
  • Difficulty concentrating

These symptoms usually go away after a couple of days.

  • Caffeine in the diet (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Caffeine overdose (Medical Encyclopedia)


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Poisoning

A poison is any substance that is harmful to your body. You might swallow it, inhale it, inject it, or absorb it through your skin. Any substance can be poisonous if too much is taken. Poisons can include

  • Prescription or over-the-counter medicines taken in doses that are too high
  • Overdoses of illegal drugs
  • Carbon monoxide from gas appliances
  • Household products, such as laundry powder or furniture polish
  • Pesticides
  • Indoor or outdoor plants
  • Metals such as lead and mercury

The effects of poisoning range from short-term illness to brain damage, coma, and death. To prevent poisoning it is important to use and store products exactly as their labels say. Keep dangerous products where children can't get to them. Treatment for poisoning depends on the type of poison. If you suspect someone has been poisoned, call your local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222 right away.

  • Poisoning (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Poisoning first aid (Medical Encyclopedia)
  • Toxicology screen (Medical Encyclopedia)


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