ICD-10 Diagnosis Code I42.0

Dilated cardiomyopathy

Diagnosis Code I42.0

ICD-10: I42.0
Short Description: Dilated cardiomyopathy
Long Description: Dilated cardiomyopathy
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code I42.0

Valid for Submission
The code I42.0 is valid for submission for HIPAA-covered transactions.

Code Classification
  • Diseases of the circulatory system (I00–I99)
    • Other forms of heart disease (I30-I52)
      • Cardiomyopathy (I42)

Information for Medical Professionals

Diagnostic Related Groups
The diagnosis code I42.0 is grouped in the following Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG V34.0)

  • 314 - OTHER CIRCULATORY SYSTEM DIAGNOSES WITH MCC
  • 315 - OTHER CIRCULATORY SYSTEM DIAGNOSES WITH CC
  • 316 - OTHER CIRCULATORY SYSTEM DIAGNOSES WITHOUT CC/MCC

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The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

Synonyms
  • Cardiomyopathy in Friedreich's ataxia
  • Cardiomyopathy in myotonic dystrophy
  • Congestive cardiomyopathy
  • Congestive obstructive cardiomyopathy
  • Dilated cardiomyopathy 3B
  • Dilated cardiomyopathy associated with connective tissue disorder
  • Dilated cardiomyopathy caused by radiation
  • Dilated cardiomyopathy due to taurine deficiency
  • Dilated cardiomyopathy secondary to amyloidosis
  • Dilated cardiomyopathy secondary to bacterial myocarditis
  • Dilated cardiomyopathy secondary to deficiency
  • Dilated cardiomyopathy secondary to dermatomyositis
  • Dilated cardiomyopathy secondary to electrolyte deficiency
  • Dilated cardiomyopathy secondary to familial storage disease
  • Dilated cardiomyopathy secondary to Friedreich's ataxia
  • Dilated cardiomyopathy secondary to fungal myocarditis
  • Dilated cardiomyopathy secondary to glycogen storage disease
  • Dilated cardiomyopathy secondary to granuloma
  • Dilated cardiomyopathy secondary to granuloma
  • Dilated cardiomyopathy secondary to hemochromatosis
  • Dilated cardiomyopathy secondary to infection
  • Dilated cardiomyopathy secondary to infection
  • Dilated cardiomyopathy secondary to infection
  • Dilated cardiomyopathy secondary to infection
  • Dilated cardiomyopathy secondary to infection
  • Dilated cardiomyopathy secondary to infection
  • Dilated cardiomyopathy secondary to infiltration
  • Dilated cardiomyopathy secondary to infiltration
  • Dilated cardiomyopathy secondary to infiltration
  • Dilated cardiomyopathy secondary to malignancy
  • Dilated cardiomyopathy secondary to metabolic disorder
  • Dilated cardiomyopathy secondary to metazoal myocarditis
  • Dilated cardiomyopathy secondary to mucopolysaccharidosis
  • Dilated cardiomyopathy secondary to muscular dystrophy
  • Dilated cardiomyopathy secondary to myotonic dystrophy
  • Dilated cardiomyopathy secondary to neuromuscular disorder
  • Dilated cardiomyopathy secondary to nutritive deficiency
  • Dilated cardiomyopathy secondary to polyarteritis nodosa
  • Dilated cardiomyopathy secondary to protozoal myocarditis
  • Dilated cardiomyopathy secondary to Refsum's disease
  • Dilated cardiomyopathy secondary to rheumatoid arthritis
  • Dilated cardiomyopathy secondary to sarcoidosis
  • Dilated cardiomyopathy secondary to scleroderma
  • Dilated cardiomyopathy secondary to sensitivity
  • Dilated cardiomyopathy secondary to viral myocarditis
  • Dilated cardiomyopathy with genetic marker
  • Familial cardiomyopathy
  • Familial cardiomyopathy
  • Heart disease caused by ionizing radiation
  • Ischemic congestive cardiomyopathy
  • Ischemic congestive cardiomyopathy
  • Ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy due to coronary artery disease
  • Ischemic myocardial dysfunction
  • Ischemic myocardial dysfunction
  • Nonischemic congestive cardiomyopathy
  • Primary dilated cardiomyopathy
  • Primary familial dilated cardiomyopathy
  • Primary idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy
  • Secondary dilated cardiomyopathy
  • Secondary nonischemic congestive cardiomyopathy

Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code I42.0 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:


Information for Patients


Cardiomyopathy

Also called: Dilated cardiomyopathy, Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, Myocardiopathy, Restrictive cardiomyopathy

Cardiomyopathy is the name for diseases of the heart muscle. These diseases enlarge your heart muscle or make it thicker and more rigid than normal. In rare cases, scar tissue replaces the muscle tissue.

Some people live long, healthy lives with cardiomyopathy. Some people don't even realize they have it. In others, however, it can make the heart less able to pump blood through the body. This can cause serious complications, including

  • Heart failure
  • Abnormal heart rhythms
  • Heart valve problems
  • Sudden cardiac arrest

Heart attacks, high blood pressure, infections, and other diseases can all cause cardiomyopathy. Some types of cardiomyopathy run in families. In many people, however, the cause is unknown. Treatment might involve medicines, surgery, other medical procedures, and lifestyle changes.

NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  • Cardiac catheterization
  • Cardiomyopathy
  • Dilated cardiomyopathy
  • Electrocardiogram
  • Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy


[Read More]

DMD-associated dilated cardiomyopathy DMD-associated dilated cardiomyopathy is a form of heart disease that is caused by mutations in the DMD gene. Dilated cardiomyopathy enlarges and weakens the heart (cardiac) muscle, preventing the heart from pumping blood efficiently. Signs and symptoms of this condition can include an irregular heartbeat (arrhythmia), shortness of breath, extreme tiredness (fatigue), and swelling of the legs and feet. In males with DMD-associated dilated cardiomyopathy, heart problems usually develop early in life and worsen quickly, leading to heart failure in adolescence or early adulthood. In affected females, the condition appears later in life and worsens more slowly.Dilated cardiomyopathy is a feature of two related conditions that are also caused by mutations in the DMD gene: Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy. In addition to heart disease, these conditions are characterized by progressive weakness and wasting of muscles used for movement (skeletal muscles). People with DMD-associated dilated cardiomyopathy typically do not have any skeletal muscle weakness or wasting, although they may have subtle changes in their skeletal muscle cells that are detectable through laboratory testing. Based on these skeletal muscle changes, DMD-associated dilated cardiomyopathy is sometimes classified as subclinical Becker muscular dystrophy.
[Read More]

Familial dilated cardiomyopathy Familial dilated cardiomyopathy is a genetic form of heart disease. It occurs when heart (cardiac) muscle becomes stretched out in at least one chamber of the heart, causing the open area of the chamber to become enlarged (dilated). As a result, the heart is unable to pump blood as efficiently as usual. Eventually, all four chambers of the heart become dilated as the cardiac muscle tries to increase the amount of blood being pumped through the heart. However, as the cardiac muscle becomes increasingly thin and weakened, it is less able to pump blood. Over time, this condition results in heart failure.It usually takes many years for symptoms of familial dilated cardiomyopathy to appear. They typically begin in mid-adulthood, but can occur at any time from infancy to late adulthood. Signs and symptoms of familial dilated cardiomyopathy can include an irregular heartbeat (arrhythmia), shortness of breath (dyspnea), extreme tiredness (fatigue), fainting episodes (syncope), and swelling of the legs and feet. In some cases, the first sign of the disorder is sudden cardiac death. The severity of the condition varies among affected individuals, even in members of the same family.
[Read More]
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