ICD-10 Diagnosis Code C34.90

Malignant neoplasm of unsp part of unsp bronchus or lung

Diagnosis Code C34.90

ICD-10: C34.90
Short Description: Malignant neoplasm of unsp part of unsp bronchus or lung
Long Description: Malignant neoplasm of unspecified part of unspecified bronchus or lung
This is the 2017 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code C34.90

Valid for Submission
The code C34.90 is valid for submission for HIPAA-covered transactions.

Code Classification
  • Neoplasms (C00–D48)
    • Malignant neoplasms of respiratory and intrathoracic organs (C30-C39)
      • Malignant neoplasm of bronchus and lung (C34)

Information for Medical Professionals

Diagnostic Related Groups
The diagnosis code C34.90 is grouped in the following Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG V34.0)

  • 180 - RESPIRATORY NEOPLASMS WITH MCC
  • 181 - RESPIRATORY NEOPLASMS WITH CC
  • 182 - RESPIRATORY NEOPLASMS WITHOUT CC/MCC

Convert to ICD-9 Additional informationCallout TooltipGeneral Equivalence Map
The ICD-10 and ICD-9 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

Synonyms
  • Adenocarcinoma of lung
  • Adenocarcinoma of lung, stage I
  • Adenocarcinoma of lung, stage II
  • Adenocarcinoma of lung, stage III
  • Adenocarcinoma of lung, stage IV
  • Adenosquamous carcinoma
  • Bronchioloalveolar carcinoma
  • Carcinoma of lung parenchyma
  • Giant cell carcinoma of lung
  • Large cell carcinoma of lung
  • Large cell carcinoma of lung, TNM stage 1
  • Large cell carcinoma of lung, TNM stage 2
  • Large cell carcinoma of lung, TNM stage 3
  • Large cell carcinoma of lung, TNM stage 4
  • Local recurrence of malignant tumor of lung
  • Malignant epithelial neoplasm of lung
  • Malignant tumor of bronchus
  • Malignant tumor of lung
  • Malignant tumor of lung parenchyma
  • Metastasis from malignant tumor of bronchus
  • Metastasis from malignant tumor of lung
  • Non-small cell carcinoma of lung, TNM stage 1
  • Non-small cell carcinoma of lung, TNM stage 2
  • Non-small cell carcinoma of lung, TNM stage 3
  • Non-small cell carcinoma of lung, TNM stage 4
  • Non-small cell lung cancer
  • Non-small cell lung cancer with mutation in epidermal growth factor receptor
  • Non-small cell lung cancer without mutation in epidermal growth factor receptor
  • Non-small cell lung cancer, negative for epidermal growth factor receptor expression
  • Non-small cell lung cancer, positive for epidermal growth factor receptor expression
  • Nonsquamous nonsmall cell neoplasm of lung
  • Oat cell carcinoma of lung
  • Pleuropulmonary blastoma
  • Pleuropulmonary blastoma type I
  • Pleuropulmonary blastoma type II
  • Pleuropulmonary blastoma type III
  • Primary acinar cell carcinoma of lung
  • Primary adenocarcinoma of lung
  • Primary adenoid cystic carcinoma of lung
  • Primary adenosquamous carcinoma of lung
  • Primary basaloid squamous cell carcinoma of lung
  • Primary carcinosarcoma of lung
  • Primary clear cell adenocarcinoma of lung
  • Primary clear cell squamous cell carcinoma of lung
  • Primary fetal adenocarcinoma of lung
  • Primary malignant neoplasm of bronchus
  • Primary malignant neoplasm of lung
  • Primary mixed mucinous and non-mucinous bronchiolo-alveolar carcinoma of lung
  • Primary mixed subtype adenocarcinoma of lung
  • Primary mucinous adenocarcinoma of lung
  • Primary mucinous bronchiolo-alveolar carcinoma of lung
  • Primary mucinous cystadenocarcinoma of lung
  • Primary mucoepidermoid carcinoma of lung
  • Primary myoepithelial carcinoma of lung
  • Primary non-mucinous bronchiolo-alveolar carcinoma of lung
  • Primary papillary adenocarcinoma of lung
  • Primary papillary squamous cell carcinoma of lung
  • Primary pleomorphic carcinoma of lung
  • Primary pseudosarcomatous carcinoma of lung
  • Primary salivary gland type carcinoma of lung
  • Primary signet ring cell carcinoma of lung
  • Primary small cell non-keratinizing squamous cell carcinoma of lung
  • Primary solid carcinoma of lung
  • Primary spindle cell carcinoma of lung
  • Primary undifferentiated carcinoma of lung
  • Pulmonary blastoma
  • Small cell carcinoma of lung
  • Squamous cell carcinoma of bronchus
  • Squamous cell carcinoma of lung
  • Squamous cell carcinoma of lung, TNM stage 1
  • Squamous cell carcinoma of lung, TNM stage 2
  • Squamous cell carcinoma of lung, TNM stage 3
  • Squamous cell carcinoma of lung, TNM stage 4

Index of Diseases and Injuries
References found for the code C34.90 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:


Information for Patients


Lung Cancer

Also called: Bronchogenic carcinoma

Lung cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. It is a leading cause of cancer death in men and women in the United States. Cigarette smoking causes most lung cancers. The more cigarettes you smoke per day and the earlier you started smoking, the greater your risk of lung cancer. High levels of pollution, radiation and asbestos exposure may also increase risk.

Common symptoms of lung cancer include

  • A cough that doesn't go away and gets worse over time
  • Constant chest pain
  • Coughing up blood
  • Shortness of breath, wheezing, or hoarseness
  • Repeated problems with pneumonia or bronchitis
  • Swelling of the neck and face
  • Loss of appetite or weight loss
  • Fatigue

Doctors diagnose lung cancer using a physical exam, imaging, and lab tests. Treatment depends on the type, stage, and how advanced it is. Treatments include surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and targeted therapy. Targeted therapy uses substances that attack cancer cells without harming normal cells.

NIH: National Cancer Institute

  • After chemotherapy - discharge
  • Coughing up blood
  • Lung cancer
  • Lung cancer - non-small cell
  • Lung cancer - small cell
  • Lung PET scan
  • Lung surgery
  • Metastatic cancer to the lung
  • Solitary pulmonary nodule
  • Understanding Chemotherapy - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)
  • What to Know about Brachytherapy (A Type of Internal Radiation Therapy) - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)
  • What to Know about External Beam Radiation Therapy - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Cancer Institute)


[Read More]

Lung cancer Lung cancer is a disease in which certain cells in the lungs become abnormal and multiply uncontrollably to form a tumor. Lung cancer may or may not cause signs or symptoms in its early stages. Some people with lung cancer have chest pain, frequent coughing, breathing problems, trouble swallowing or speaking, blood in the mucus, loss of appetite and weight loss, fatigue, or swelling in the face or neck. Lung cancer occurs most often in adults in their sixties or seventies. Most people who develop lung cancer have a history of long-term tobacco smoking; however, the condition can occur in people who have never smoked.Lung cancer is generally divided into two types, small cell lung cancer and non-small cell lung cancer, based on the size of the affected cells when viewed under a microscope. Non-small cell lung cancer accounts for 85 percent of lung cancer, while small cell lung cancer accounts for the remaining 15 percent.Small cell lung cancer grows quickly and often spreads to other tissues (metastasizes), most commonly to the adrenal glands (small hormone-producing glands located on top of each kidney), liver, brain, and bones. In more than half of cases, the small cell lung cancer has spread beyond the lung at the time of diagnosis. After diagnosis, most people with small cell lung cancer survive for about one year; less than seven percent survive 5 years.Non-small cell lung cancer is divided into three main subtypes: adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and large cell lung carcinoma. Adenocarcinoma arises from the cells that line the small air sacs (alveoli) located throughout the lungs. Squamous cell carcinoma arises from the squamous cells that line the passages leading from the windpipe to the lungs (bronchi). Large cell carcinoma describes non-small cell lung cancers that do not appear to be adenocarcinomas or squamous cell carcinomas. As the name suggests, the tumor cells are large when viewed under a microscope. The 5-year survival rate for people with non-small cell lung cancer is usually between 11 and 17 percent; it can be lower or higher depending on the subtype and stage of the cancer.
[Read More]
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